Posts Tagged ‘Amelie Thyssen’

Yo Pagué a Hitler (I Paid Hitler) – A Thyssen Vanity Project Then and Now

First published in 1941, the book ‘I Paid Hitler’, whose authorship Fritz Thyssen both claimed and denied at different times, has recently been republished in Spain by Editorial Renacimiento of Seville, with a foreword by Juan Bonilla, under the title ‘Yo Pagué a Hitler’.

But why?

Seventy-six years ago, the work was brokered, edited and largely written by a highly intelligent Jewish, formerly Hungarian literary hustler by the name of Emery Reves (Imre Révész), who made a great deal of money from such things; much of it from subsequently representing Winston Churchill’s literary and journalistic endeavours.

With the encouragement of Reves, the considerably less intelligent Fritz Thyssen attempted to convince his readers that he deserved admiration for his courage in opposing allied First World War reparation demands on Germany. He also craved a sympathetic understanding for his financial support of Hitler as a means of preventing the spread of communism, as well as an acceptance of the notion that he had rejected the Third Reich when he realised the truth of its ambitions in late 1939.

This initial ploy, however, remained largely unsuccessful, as the book was dismissed by many as delusional, self-protective propaganda.

Meanwhile, Fritz, eager to cultivate what he saw as his new-found status of international, political celebrity, had given up his plans of escaping to Argentina (the anonymity of which he feared) and remained in Europe. But, courtesy of the Gestapo, by late 1940 he found himself back in Nazi Germany – together with his wife – where they would be held quite comfortably, first in a private sanatorium and, from 1943 onwards, in the VIP sections (!) of various concentration camps.

Today, at a time when the Fritz Thyssen Foundation of Cologne (founded in 1959 by Fritz Thyssen’s widow Amelie Thyssen as a memorial and tax efficient means of cultivating academic favour by providing financial support for research projects), is busy funding an academic rewriting of the Thyssen corporate and familial history, the reappearance of the book ‘I Paid Hitler’ could prove somewhat of an embarrassment. Indeed, they have already acknowledged the fact that a number of the statements in the work are, in fact, untrue!

So why now? And why in Spain?

When we pointed out in ‘The Thyssen Art Macabre’ that Fritz Thyssen and his wife had fled Germany, not, as claimed, in protest against Adolf Hitler’s invasion of Poland, but largely because of a fear of punishment for their grave contraventions of German tax regulations and foreign exchange controls (to the tune of 48 million Reichsmark, i.e. some 350 million Euros at today’s rate), their eldest grandson, Count Alejandro Zichy-Thyssen, posted a review of ‘The Thyssen Art Macabre’ on Amazon which read thus:

’……I find it incredible that someone can loose his time to try so smear one of the important Dutch/German families. It is a much better reading the book “I Paid Hitler” by Fritz Thyssen who was published in 1941 during the war when Hitler had the most powerful army behind him. Then to stand up and try to warn the United States of whom Hitler really was demanded an act of courage. Courage from a hero (Iron Cross) of the First World War. This man was captured by Hitler in 1940 and was put in a concentration camp. To try to smear his family name sixty years later inventing stories about the family in order to sell a book, I leave to you reader to judge the character of such a writer?’

It could thus seem reasonable to assume that, given the fact the Zichy-Thyssens have achieved very little in their lives apart from fortuitous parental choice, resulting in their exceptional wealth, they might have been responsible for funding this latest publishing venture.

So why Spain?

Well, having been raised in Argentina, the Zichy-Thyssens’ grasp of the Spanish language is somewhat better than their obviously tenuous grasp of English.

It should also, perhaps, not be forgotten that the Third Reich was partially responsible for General Franco’s success in the Spanish Civil War and the resulting subjugation of the population to fascist rule, which lasted well into the 1970s. There must still be many Spanish who remain sympathetic to the likes of Fritz Thyssen and of his family’s faded ‘fascist glory’.

And why now?

Well, perhaps because, despite all the academic polishing, the Thyssen reputation continues to rust. Perhaps because our seminal book has obliged the Fritz Thyssen Foundation-funded academics to admit more than the Zichy-Thyssen family is prepared to accept, without protest. And perhaps because ‘I Paid Hitler’ can once again resume its vainglorious objectives as a tool of Thyssen propaganda.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in The Thyssen Art Macabre, Thyssen Corporate, Thyssen Family No Comments »

The Fritz Thyssen Foundation admits its role in banishing the shadows of the family’s Nazi past

The Thyssens have always denied the full extent of their Nazi past.

Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza’s side of the family achieved this by camouflaging his supportive industrial and banking facilities behind a dubious Hungarian nationality and Swiss residency, while claiming his brother Fritz to have been solely responsible for what little collaboration with the National Socialist regime the family was willing to admit.

The fact that Fritz Thyssen had co-operated with Emery Reves on a book entitled „I Paid Hitler“ made it easy to divert the spotlight onto his side of the family.

To save his own skin, Fritz and his lawyers alleged that the book had been authored by Reves rather than himself and that the representation of his guilt was grossly exaggerated. This strategy had some success and, at his denazification trial, Fritz Thyssen was judged to have been a „minor Nazi offender“.

A recent book funded by the Fritz Thyssen Foundation (Felix de Taillez: “Two Burghers’ Lives in the Public Eye. The Brothers Fritz Thyssen and Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza”. Schöningh Verlag Paderborn), however, finds that an investigation by Norman Cousins in 1949 showed conclusively that „I Paid Hitler“ was much more authentic than Fritz Thyssen and his lawyers had argued.

Nonetheless, following Fritz Thyssen’s death, the executor of his will, Robert Ellscheid, in close co-operation with his unrepentant widow, Amelie Thyssen (an ex Nazi-party member from 1931 onwards), set the family firmly onto a path of uncompromising historical obfuscation.

On the occasion of Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza’s entombment in the Thyssen family crypt at Landsberg Castle in the Ruhr on 27 June 1952, Ellscheid addressed the funeral guests as well as the assembled press thus (in the words of Felix de Taillez):

„He asked for help, in the name of the family and of all Germans, who had anything to do with the Thyssens, and in the interests of the whole nation, to work together so that the ‘criminal and untrue allegations’ about Fritz Thyssen would disappear from the public domain.

de Taillez eventually concludes: „The public rehabilitation of Fritz Thyssen was practically complete in 1959/1960 when Amelie (Thyssen) and Anita (Zichy-Thyssen) together put shares in the amount of 100 Million Mark into a charitable foundation for the promotion of scientific advances bearing his name, in order to give the remembrance of the deceased a permanently positive image“.

And finally: „The work of the foundation came soon to be recognised in Germany as well as abroad and thus the long shadows of Thyssen’s Nazi past disappeared from the public domain“.

In other words, the Fritz Thyssen Foundation now concedes that the Thyssen family had a darker Nazi past than previously admitted, that it made a conscious decision to white-wash Fritz’s (and by extension the whole family’s) Nazi past, and that the foundation played a role in doing so.

Thus the Thyssens and their advisors, in an unscrupulous and unjustifiably domineering way, once again abused the German nation for their own self-serving purposes.

We call upon the German government to take this admission by the Fritz Thyssen Foundation, as well as our findings on the Thyssens’ support of National Socialist rule, into account when updating its position on the investigation of Nazi continuities in public life, Holocaust Remembrance and other related issues.

Thirty years ago such a request would have been unthinkable but now we feel entirely confident that the academic revelations made are coming about as a direct result of our investigative, historiographic and journalistic endeavours, over the past 25 years, concerning the history of the Thyssens, and that it was this that has obliged their corporate, if not their private, public relations machine to change direction.

As we have no intention of reducing our pressure on the Thyssen complex, it seems more and more likely that the family will indeed, eventually, be obliged to adopt a modern-day policy of full disclosure concerning their tarnished past, which will advance immeasurably our understanding of that period of history.

The Thyssen smoke and mirror constructs of the past 70 years are still being maintained to some extent and the breadth of material in the public domain that needs to be corrected is vast. But the first official step towards historical candour has now been made and our satisfaction in having played a part in bringing about this U-turn is immense.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in The Thyssen Art Macabre, Thyssen Corporate, Thyssen Family No Comments »

Die Fritz Thyssen Stiftung erklärt ihre Rolle beim öffentlichen Unsichtbarmachen der langen Schatten der Thyssenschen NS-Vergangenheit

Die Thyssens haben stets die volle Bandbreite Ihrer NS-Vergangenheit verleugnet.

Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemiszas Seite der Familie gelang dies durch Tarnung ihrer industriellen und Bankenaktivitäten hinter fragwürdigen ungarischen Staatsbürgerschaften und schweizer Wohnsitzen, während behauptet wurde, nur der Bruder Fritz sei für das Wenige verantwortlich gewesen, was die Familie an Zusammenarbeit mit dem nationalsozialistischen Regime zuzugeben bereit war.

Die Tatsache, dass Fritz Thyssen mit Emery Reves an einem Buch mit dem Titel „I Paid Hitler“ (Ich bezahlte Hitler) zusammen gearbeitet hatte, machte es einfach, den Scheinwerfer auf seine Seite der Familie zu lenken.

Um seine eigene Haut zu retten, gab Fritz, über seine Anwälte, an, das Buch sei von Reves und nicht von ihm verfasst worden, und die Angaben zu seiner Schuld darin seien vollkommen übertrieben. Diese Strategie hatte einigen Erfolg und Fritz wurde bei seiner Denazifizierung als „minderbelastet“ eingestuft.

Ein neues, von der Fritz Thyssen Stiftung unterstütztes Buch (Felix de Taillez: “Zwei Bürgerleben in der Öffentlichkeit. Die Brüder Fritz Thyssen und Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza”. Schöningh Verlag Paderborn) zeigt jedoch, dass eine Untersuchung durch Norman Cousins 1949 zu dem eindeutigen Schluss kam, dass „I Paid Hitler“ offensichtlich viel authentischer war, als von Fritz Thyssen und seinen Anwälten behauptet.

Nichtsdestotrotz führte der Testamentsvollstrecker Robert Ellscheid nach Fritz Thyssens Tod, in enger Zusammenarbeit mit dessen reuloser Witwe Amelie (ex-NSDAP-Mitglied seit 1931) die Familie auf einen kompromisslosen Weg verbrämender Geschichsschreibung.

Bei der Überführung des Sargs Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemiszas in die Familiengruft auf Schloss Landsberg in der Ruhr am 27. Juni 1952 erklärte Ellscheid vor den versammelten Gästen und Medienvertretern folgendes (in den Worten von Felix de Taillez):

“(Er bat) im Namen der Familie sowie aller Deutscher, die in irgendeiner Weise mit den Thyssens zu tun hätten, im Interesse der ganzen Nation um Mithilfe, damit endlich die ‘verbrecherischen und unwahren Behauptungen’ über Fritz Thyssen aus der Öffentlichkeit verschwänden“.

de Taillez kommt letztendlich zu dem Schluss: „Eine nahezu vollständige öffentliche Rehabilitation Fritz Thyssens wurde 1959/1960 erreicht, als Amelie (Thyssen) und Anita (Zichy-Thyssen) zusammen Aktien in Höhe von rund 100 Millionen Mark in die Gründung einer gemeinnützigen Stiftung zur Förderung der Wissenschaften einbrachten, die den Namen des Verstorbenen trug, um dauerhaft ein positives Andenken an ihn zu bewahren.“

Und: „Durch die bald über die deutschen Grenzen hinaus anerkannte Arbeit der Stiftung (…) verschwand in der Öffentlichkeit nach und nach der lange Schatten von Thyssens NS-Vergangenheit“.

Mit anderen Worten: die Fritz Thyssen Stiftung gibt nunmehr zu, dass die Thyssen Familie eine dunklere NS-Vergangenheit hatte, als bisher zugegeben, dass sie die bewusste Entscheidung traf, die NS-Vergangenheit von Fritz (und dadurch jene der gesamten Familie) weiss zu waschen, und dass die Stiftung hierbei eine Rolle gespielt hat.

Dadurch missbrauchten die Thyssens und ihre Berater die deutsche Nation einmal mehr in einer skrupellosen, unberechtigt dominanten Weise für ihre eigennützigen Belange.

Wir appellieren an die deutsche Bundesregierung, dieses Eingeständnis der Fritz Thyssen Stiftung, sowie die Ergebnisse unserer Arbeit zum Thema Thyssen, bezüglich ihrer Position zur Aufarbeitung von NS-Kontinuitäten im öffentlichen Leben und der Erinnerungskultur etc. zu berücksichtigen.

Vor dreissig Jahren wäre solch eine Aufforderung undenkbar gewesen. Jetzt aber sind wir überzeugt, dass die beschriebenen akademischen Offenbarungen ein direktes Resultat unserer Forschungs-, biographischen und journalistischen Arbeit der letzten 25 Jahre zur Geschichte der Thyssens sind. Diese hat die Öffentlichkeitsarbeit des Komplexes, wenn auch nicht die der Familie, in eine neue Richtung gezwungen.

Da wir nicht beabsichtigen, unseren Druck auf die Thyssens zu verringern, erscheint es nunmehr möglich, dass auch die Familie letztendlich eine moderne Offenlegungspolitik betreiben wird, was einen unschätzbaren Beitrag zum besseren Verständnis der Geschichte des Dritten Reichs darstellen würde.

Die Thyssenschen Verschleierungen der letzten 70 Jahre durch Weihrauch und Selbstinszenierung

werden teilweise noch fort geführt. Auch ist das Ausmaß des Materials zu diesem Themenkomplex, das im öffentlichen Raum steht, und welches korrigiert werden muss, enorm. Doch der erste offizielle Schritt zur historischen Aufrichtigkeit ist jetzt gemacht. Unsere Zufriedenheit, bei dieser wichtigen Entwicklung eine Rolle gespielt zu haben, ist immens.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in The Thyssen Art Macabre, Thyssen Corporate, Thyssen Family No Comments »

Buchrezension: Thyssen im 20. Jahrhundert – Band 3: “Die Thyssens als Kunstsammler. Investition und symbolisches Kapital (1900-1970)”, von Johannes Gramlich, erschienen im Schöningh Verlag, 2015.

 

Nach all den Ausweichmanövern um die Geschäftemacherei mit dem Tod und dem Elend anderer Menschen schauen wir jetzt auf die „glitzernde“ Seite der Medaille, nämlich die sogenannten Kunstbemühungen der Thyssen Familie. Diese hatten mehr mir Kapitalflucht, der Umgehung von Devisenkontrollen und Steuervermeidung (Kunstsammlungen werden von Gramlich als „probates, da schwer zu kontrollierendes Mittel, um Steuerforderungen zu mindern“ beschrieben), kurzfristiger Spekulation, Kapitalschutz und Profitmaximierung, als mit einer ernsthaften Beschäftigung mit oder gar Erschaffung von Kunst zu tun.

Bezeichnenderweise ist bisher keine einzige Rezension dieses dritten Bands in der Serie „Thyssen im 20. Jahrhundert: Die Thyssens als Kunstsammler“ ermittelbar, welcher wiederum nichts anderes darstellt, als die verkürzte Form (mit fast 400 Seiten!) einer Doktorarbeit, diesmal an der Universität von München. Nicht eine einzige Erwähnung irgendwo, dass dieser Student der Geschichte, Germanistik und Musik vielleicht nicht genau weiss, wovon er schreibt, da er keine vorherige Kenntnis der Kunstgeschichte zu haben scheint oder irgendein ersichtliches persönliches Talent für die bildenden Künste. Oder darüber, dass viel zu viel von der Kunst, die die Thyssens erwarben, Plunder war. Oder dass die Thyssens behaupteten, Ungarn zu sein, wenn sie etwas von Ungarn wollten, Schweizer wenn sie etwas von der Schweiz wollten, und Niederländer wenn sie etwas von den Niederlanden wollten.

Prinzipiell scheint die hauptsächliche Aussage dieses Buches folgende zu sein: lang anhaltend zu täuschen ist die höchste Leistung überhaupt, und so lange einer reich und mächtig und unmoralisch genug ist, um sein ganzes Leben lang zu täuschen, dann wird es ihm gut ergehen. Nicht zuletzt deshalb, weil er genug Geld in einem Legat hinterlassen kann, damit an seinem Ruf weiterpoliert werden und eine anhaltende Mythologisierung auch nach seinem Ableben vonstatten gehen kann. Und falls die Person noch das zusätzliche Glück hat, auf ihrem Weg vom Unglück anderer zu profitieren, um so besser – so wie es in diesem Buch von Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza im Falle der jüdischen Sammlungen von Herbert Gutmann und Max Alsberg beschrieben wird und von Fritz Thyssen im Falle derer von Julius Kien und Maximilian von Goldschmidt-Rothschild.

Aber: findet irgend jemand diese Aussage akzeptabel?!

Seltsamerweise enthält dieses Buch auch einige sehr negative Bewertungen des wahren Charakters einiger Thyssens. Fritz Thyssen wird (in einem Zitat von Christian Nebenhay) als „wenig imponierend“ und „nichtssagend“ beschrieben. Von seinem Bruder Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza wird gesagt, er sei „sehr schwierig“, „unangenehm“, „geizig“ gewesen, habe „vereinbarte Zahlungsmodalitäten (…) nicht immer einhalten (wollen)“ und habe „offensichtlich wenig Verständnis für die Bedürfnisse und Wünsche von Menschen aufbringen (können), die sich in einem Abhängigkeitsverhältnis zu ihm befanden“. Von Amelie Thyssen wird gesagt, sie habe sich „um eine autorisierte Biographie über ihren Ehemann (bemüht). Die Vorgänge um Thyssens Abkehr vom Nationalsozialismus sollten darin eine größere Rolle spielen, für die eine Verzerrung der Überlieferung in Kauf genommen worden wäre“. Auch habe sie über den genauen Zeitpunkt von Kunstkäufen die Unwahrheit gesagt, um Steuern zu sparen.

Zum Glück kannten wir keine Thyssens aus dieser zweiten Generation. Dafür kannten wir aber Heini Thyssen, den letzten direkten männlichen Nachfahren August Thyssen’s, und das sehr gut. Über ca. 25 Jahre hinweg (Litchfield länger als Schmitz) hatten wir das Glück, alles in allem viele Monate in seiner Gesellschaft zu verbringen. Wir mochten und vermissen ihn beide sehr. Er war ein großartiger Mann mit einem wunderbaren Sinn für Humor und einer sprühenden Intelligenz. Das Erstaunlichste an ihm, angesichts des allgemeinen Überlegenheitsgefühls der Familie, war, dass er selbst überhaupt nicht arrogant war.

Heini Thyssen beschrieb uns gegenüber den Kunsthandel als „das schmutzigste Geschäft der Welt“. Er wusste genauestens Bescheid über die Geheimniskrämereien der Händler, die Hyperbeln der Auktionshäuser und die Unaufrichtigkeiten der Experten. Es war eine rauhe See, die er mit der richtigen Kombination von Vorsicht und Wagemut navigierte, um erfolgreich zu sein. Aber er nutzte natürlich den Kunsthandel auch gnadenlos aus, um sich ein neues Image zu verleihen. Im Gegensatz zu seinem Vater und Onkel, war er damit so unglaublich erfolgreich, eben weil er so ein sympathischer Mensch war.

Aber Heini Thyssen war deshalb noch lange kein tugendhafter Mensch. Er täuschte weiterhin über seine Nationalität, den Ursprung und die Größe seines Vermögens, seine Verantwortung und seine Ergebenheit, genauso wie sein Vater, sein Onkel, seine Tante (und bis zu einem gewissen Grad auch sein Großvater) es getan hatten. Und jetzt fährt diese akademische Serie damit fort, die selben alten Mythen zu verbreiten, die immer schon, seit der Gründung des modernen deutschen Nationalstaats, nötig waren, um die Spuren dieser Räuberbarone zu verwischen. Die Größe und der angebliche Wert der Thyssen-Bornemisza Sammlung brachten auch viele aus dem Kunstbetrieb und der allgemeinen Öffentlichkeit dazu, sein Verhalten zu akzeptieren.

Von der überaus wichtigen Thyssen-eigenen, niederländischen Bank voor Handel en Scheepvaart, z.B., wird immer und immer wieder behauptet, sie sei 1918 gegründet worden, obwohl das wirkliche Datum mit höchster Wahrscheinlichkeit 1910 war. Dies ist wichtig, denn die Bank war das wichtigste offshore-Instrument, welches die Thyssens nutzten, um ihre deutschen Vermögenswerte zu tarnen und ihren Konzern, sowie ihr Privatvermögen, nach dem ersten verlorenen Krieg vor einer allierten Übernahme zu schützen. Aber diese Information ist heikel, denn sie bedeutet gleichzeitig eine massive Untreue der Thyssens Deutschland gegenüber, dem Land das die einzige ursprüngliche Quelle ihres Reichtums ist, war, und immer sein wird.

Und auch hier wird wieder von Heinrich und Heini Thyssen behauptet, sie seien ungarische Staatsangehörige gewesen, vermutlich weil dies entschuldigen soll, dass sie trotz ihrer massiven Unterstützung der Kriegsmaschinerie der Nazis, die einige der verheerendsten Verbrechen in der Geschichte der Menschheit ermöglichte, auch nach dem zweiten verlorenen Krieg der alliierten Vergeltung entgingen. In Wirklichkeit war Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemiszas ungarische Nationalität höchst fragwürdig, aus folgenden Gründen: weil er sie ursprünglich „gekauft“ hatte, weil sie nicht durch regelmäßige Besuche in dem Land, das er wieder verlassen hatte, aufrecht erhalten wurde, weil Verlängerungen durch gesponsorte Freunde und Verwandte arrangiert wurden, die in diplomatischen Einrichtungen arbeiteten und weil Heinrich seine deutsche Nationalität aufrecht erhielt. Im Falle von Heini Thyssen war dessen Status vollständig davon abhängig, dass sein Stiefvater in der ungarischen Botschaft in Bern arbeitete und ihm die nötigen Ausweispapiere besorgte (eine von uns als Ersten etablierte Tatsache, die nun aber von der „Nachwuchsgruppenleiterin“ Simone Derix in ihrem Buch über das Vermögen und die Identität der Thyssens so dargestellt wird, als sei es ihre eigene “akademische” Erkenntnis; die entsprechende Habilitationsschrift (!) ist bereits intern verfügbar. Seltsamerweise wird ihr Buch, obwohl es Band 4 in der Serie ist, erst nach Band 5 erscheinen). Diese ungarischen Nationalitäten als legitim zu bezeichnen ist absolut falsch. Und es ist ein sehr wichtiger Punkt.

Als Philip Hendy von der Nationalgalerie in London 1961 eine Ausstellung mit Bildern aus Heini Thyssens Sammlung organisierte, sagte ihm Heini anscheinend, er könne unmöglich im selben Jahr ausstellen wie Emil Bührle und fügte hinzu: „Wissen Sie, Bührle was ein echter deutscher ‘Rüstungsmagnat’, der später Schweizer wurde, es wäre also für mich sehr schlecht, (…) mit deutschen Waffen in Verbindung gebracht zu werden (…)“. Aber der Grund für seine Sorgen war nicht, wie es dieses Buch zu vermitteln scheint, dass Heini Thyssen nichts mit deutschen Waffen zu tun hatte, sondern eben gerade dass er damit zu tun hatte! Da diese anteilige Quelle des Thyssen-Vermögens nun von Alexander Donges und Thomas Urban bereits zugegeben wurde, ist es höchst fragwürdig, dass Johannes Gramlich in seiner Arbeit nicht auf diese Tatsache hinweist.

Dann wiederum gibt es in diesem Werk neue Zugeständnisse, wie z.B. die Tatsache, dass August Thyssen und Auguste Rodin keine enge Freundschaft hatten, wie es in den bisherigen wichtigen Büchern verbreitet wurde, sondern dass ihre Beziehung vielmehr – wegen Streitereien um Geld, einer Nützlichkeitspolitik der Öffentlichkeit gegenüber und künstlerischem Unverständnis – schlecht war. Das einzige Problem mit diesen Erläuterungen ist, dass wiederum wir die Ersten waren, die diese Realität erkannt und beschrieben haben. Nun jedoch begeht dieses Buch einen schamlosen Plagiarismus an unseren Forschungsanstrengungen und, indem vorgegeben wird, wir gehörten nicht zum „akademischen“ Kreis, werden die „akademischen Meriten“ dafür, die Ersten zu sein, dies zu veröffentlichen, von den Plagiierenden sich selbst zugeschrieben.

Eine weitere unserer Enthüllungen, welche in diesem Buch bestätigt wird, ist dass die Ausstellung der Sammlung von Heinrich Thysssen-Bornemisza in München im Jahr 1930 ein Desaster war, weil so viele der gezeigten Werke als Täuschungen bloßgestellt wurden. Luitpold Dussler im Bayerischen Kurier und in der Zeitschrift „Kunstwart“; Wilhelm Pinder in der Kunstwissenschaftlichen Gesellschaft München; Rudolf Berliner; Leo Planiscig; Armand Lowengard von Duveen Brothers und Hans Tietze gaben alle negative Kommentare über die Sammlung des Barons ab: „teures Hobby“, „eindeutig falsche Zuschreibungen“, „mehr als 100 Fälschungen, verfälschte Bilder und unmögliche Künstlernamen“, „Thyssen-Bornemisza könne die Hälfte der Ausstellungsobjekte wegwerfen“, „400 Bilder, von denen Sie keines heutzutage kaufen sollten“, „rückwärtsgewandtes Sammlungsprogramm“, „abstoßende Benennungen“, „irreführend“, „Atelierabfälle“, etc. etc. etc. Der Baron konterte, indem er insbesondere die rechts-gerichtete (!) Presse dazu antreiben ließ, positive Artikel über seine sogenannten kunstsinnigen Bestrebungen, sein patriotisches Handeln und seine philanthropische Großzügigkeit zu veröffentlichen, eine Einstellung dem Allgemeinwohl gegenüber, die allerdings nicht auf Tatsachen beruhte, sondern einzig und allein auf Thyssen-finanzierter Öffentlichkeitsarbeit.

Das Buch befasst sich fast überhaupt nicht mit den Kunstaktivitäten von Heini Thyssen, was verwunderlich ist, da er doch bei weitem der wichtigste Sammler in dieser Dynastie war. Statt dessen wird eine Menge Information weiter gegeben, die absolut nichts mit Kunst zu tun hat, wie z.B. die Tatsache, dass Fritz Thyssen das Gut Schloss Puchhof kaufte und es von Willi Grünberg verwalten ließ. In Gramlichs Worten: „Laut eines nachträglichen Gutachtens war die Bewirtschaftung des Guts unter Fritz Thyssen auf hohe Bareinnahmen ohne Rücksicht auf Substanzerhaltung oder -verbesserung angelegt, was zu einem Niedergang der Verwertbarkeit von Grund und Boden in der Zeit danach geführt habe. Nach dem Urteil des Spruchkammerverfahrens waren die Raubbau-Methoden allerdings vor allem auf Grünberg selbst zurückzuführen, der damit Tantiemen zu generieren trachtete.“ Anscheinend habe Grünberg auch während des Kriegs auf Gut Puchhof über 100 Kriegsgefangene malträtiert, aber nach einer kurzen Zeit der Untersuchung nach dem Krieg wurde er auf Geheiss von Fritz Thyssen wieder in seiner Position bestätigt. Dies gibt einen guten Eindruck davon, wie untauglich die Denazifizierungsprozedere waren, aber auch wie Thyssens Einstellung zu Menschenrechten und zur Ungültigkeit allgemeiner Gesetze für Menschen seines Standes war.

Man fragt sich auch, wieso betont wird, Fritz Thyssen habe die größte Länderei in Bayern 1938, für überteuerte 2 Millionen RM, speziell für seine Tochter Anita Zichy-Thyssen und den Schwiegersohn Gabor Zichy gekauft, obwohl uns Heini Thyssen und seine Cousine Barbara Stengel ganz eindrücklich erklärten, die Zichy-Thyssens seien mit Hermann Görings Hilfe, für den Anita als Privatsekretärin gearbeitet hatte, 1938 nach Argentinien ausgewandert, und zwar an Bord eines Schiffes der deutschen Marine. Nachdem der alte Mythos wieder aufgekocht wird, wonach Anitas Familie bei ihren Eltern war, als diese am Vorabend des Zweiten Weltkriegs aus Deutschland flohen, macht das Buch nun die zusätzliche „Enthüllung“, Anita und ihre Familie seien im Februar 1940 in Argentinien angekommen. Dies ohne jedoch zu erklären, wo die Personen in der Zwischenzeit gewesen sein sollen, während Fritz und Amelie Thyssen von der Gestapo nach Deutschland zurück gebracht wurden. Dabei ist “Februar 1940” genau das Datum, an dem Fritz und Amelie, von denen Anita später erben würde, ihre deutsche Staatsangehörigkeit aberkannt wurde, eine Tatsache, die später sehr wichtig dafür war, dass es ihnen möglich sein sollte, ihre deutschen Vermögenswerte zurück zu erlangen.

Die defensive Haltung dieses Buches zeigt sich auch daran, dass von Eduard von der Heydt, einem weiteren Nazi Bankier, Kriegsprofiteur und Kunstinvestment-Berater der Thyssens gesagt wird, „abseits aller Proteste und Unmutsregungen (…), blieb eine positiv konnotierte Verwurzelung und Präsenz in der Region (Ruhr), die bis heute unübersehbar ist“. Dies muss unter anderem darauf Bezug nehmen – spricht dies aber aus irgend einem Grund nicht an – dass einige Deutsche, denen die Rolle von der Heydts als Nazi Bankier aufstößt, dafür gesorgt haben, dass der Name des Wuppertal-Elberfelder Kulturpreises, wo sich auch das von der Heydt Museum befindet, von „Eduard von der Heydt Preis“ auf „Von der Heydt Preis“ abgeändert wurde. Es scheint hier aber so zu sein, dass ein Willi Grünberg als Fußsoldat die schlechteren Karten bekommt, während dem reichen Kosmopolit Eduard von der Heydt eine Art diplomatische Immunität zuerkannt wird. Ebenso wie in Buch 2 dieser Serie (über Zwangsarbeit) Meister und Manager an den Pranger gestellt werden, während man die Thyssens weitestgehend frei spricht. Es bleibt eine verzerrende Art, die Geschichte des Nationalsozialismus aufzuarbeiten, die so nicht mehr geschehen dürfte.

Während dessen ist es aber Johannes Gramlich erlaubt, zu berichten, dass Fritz Thyssen in Anbetracht in seinen Augen revolutionärer Umtriebe, 1931 seine Sammlung in die Schweiz überführen ließ, um sie im Sommer 1933 wieder nach Deutschland zurück bringen zu lassen – als ob es überhaupt ein noch stärkeres Anzeichen dafür geben könnte, wie sehr ihn die Machterlangung Adolf Hitlers zufrieden stellte.

Während der gleichen Periode köderte Heinrich, nach der katastrophalen Ausstellung 1930 in München, das Museum in Düsseldorf mit einem unverbindlichen In-Aussicht-Stellen einer Leihgabe seiner Sammlung. Es wird auch gesagt, er habe den Bau eines „August Thyssen Hauses“ in Düsseldorf geplant, in dem er seine Sammlung permanent unterbringen wollte. In Anbetracht der Tatsache, jedoch, das Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza nun wirklich Zeit seines Lebens und selbst für die Zeit danach noch alles unternommen hat, um niemals als Deutscher betrachtet zu werden, ist es seltsam, dass Johannes Gramlich dieses Vorhaben nicht genauer einordnet, z.B. als offensichtlich vorgetäuschter Plan oder andererseits als Beweis, dass Heinrichs aller tiefstes Zugehörigkeitsgefühl eben doch teutonisch geprägt war. Wegen der schlechten Qualität von Heinrichs Kunstkäufen gab es zwar eigentlich gar nicht wirklich eine Sammlung, die man im Museum in Düsseldorf hätte ausstellen können, aber dies hinderte dessen Direktor Dr Karl Koetschau nicht daran, sich über Jahre hinweg für sie zu engagieren. Er war enttäuscht vom Verhalten des Barons, ihn so lange hinzuhalten und die Episode bewegt sogar Johannes Gramlich dazu, negativ zu kommentieren: „Ohne Dank und Gegenleistung, die (der Baron) erst auf ausdrückliche Bitte erbrachte, nahm er trotzdem sämtliche Annehmlichkeiten in Anspruch“.

Gramlich schreibt, die Sammlung Schloss Rohoncz sei „ab 1934“ in Lugano untergebracht worden, unterlässt es aber immer noch, die genauen Zeitabläufe und logistischen Verfahren zu beschreiben, die zur Überführung von 500 Bildern in die Schweiz beigetragen haben sollen. Es ist eine Unterlassung für die es keinerlei Entschuldigung geben kann. Man sollte auch bedenken, dass 1934 das Jahr war, in dem die Schweiz ihr Bankgeheimnis verankerte, was wohl der ausschlaggebende Grund dafür gewesen sein dürfte, dass Heinrich Lugano als endgültigen Sitz seiner „Kunstsammlung“ wählte.

Die vielen, unangenehmen Auslassungen in diesem Buch sind aufschlussreich, v.a. wenn von Heini Thyssen gesagt wird, er habe eine Büste von sich anfertigen lassen, die der Künstler Nison Tregor ausführte. Dass er jedoch auch eine von Arno Breker, Hitlers bevorzugtem Bildhauer anfertigen ließ, wird nicht erwähnt. Die Aussparungen werden allerdings absolut inakzeptabel, wenn zwar vom Rennstall Erlenhof geschrieben wird, dessen „Arisierung“ (1933, von Oppenheimer zu Thyssen-Bornemisza) jedoch nicht erwähnt wird. Und ganz extrem abstoßend im Falle von Heinrichs Tochter Margit Batthyany-Thyssen, deren Beteiligung, zusammen mit ihren SS-Liebhabern, an der Greueltat an 180 jüdischen Zwangsarbeitern im März 1945 am SS-requirierten, aber Thyssen-finanzierten Schloss Rechnitz, unerwähnt bleibt. Beide Fälle werden weiterhin totgeschwiegen, was an die Art der Holocaustleugnungen eines David Irving erinnert.

Auch ist erstaunlich, dass der Autor ein starkes Bedürfnis zu haben scheint, die Frage der Finanzierung von Heinrich Thyssen’s Sammlung zu mystifizieren, obwohl Heini Thyssen uns sehr klar erklärte, dass sein Vater dies über einen Kredit tat, den er bei seiner eigenen Bank voor Handel en Scheepvaart aufnahm. Es ist ein ganz einfaches Prinzip, aber Johannes Gramlich erklärt es so umständlich, dass man denken muss, er täte dies, um es so aussehen zu lassen, als habe Thyssen Geld in einem goldenen Topf ähnlich dem heiligen Gral gehabt, der nichts mit den Thyssen Unternehmungen zu tun hatte und statt dessen beweist, dass Heinrich tatsächlich von einer alten, aristokratischen Linie entstammte, so wie er es sich wünschte (und in seinem Kopf der festen Überzeugung war, dass es der Realität entsprach!).

Es wird auch die gleichsam unwahrscheinliche Behauptung aufgestellt, alle Details jedes einzelnen der Tausende von Thyssens erstandenen Kunstwerke seien durch „das Team“ in eine riesige Datenbank eingeben worden, die ein raffiniertes Netzwerk von Informationen und Querverweisen enthält. Und dennoch werden in diesem Buch nur eine Handvoll von Bildinhalten tatsächlich erwähnt oder beschrieben. Der Leser fragt sich also immer wieder, wieso für ein Thema, das so eine große Bedeutung im Leben der Thyssens hatte, so ein unerleuchteter Mann beauftragt wurde, und nicht ein erfahrener Kunsthistoriker. Ist es deshalb, weil es einfacher ist, solch einen Mann Aussagen tätigen zu lassen wie z.B.: „Persönliche Unterlagen wurden bei der Beschlagnahme von Fritz Thyssens Vermögen durch die Nationalsozialisten im Oktober 1939 vernichtet, geschäftliche Dokumente fielen vor allem den Bomben des Zweiten Weltkriegs zum Opfer“, weil die Organisation die wahren Details des Lebens von Fritz und Amelie Thyssen während des Kriegs nicht preisgeben will? (ein kleiner Tipp: die bösen Nazis sperrten sie in Konzentrationslager und warfen die Schlüssel weg ist definitiv nicht das, was geschah). Oder weil er bereit ist, zu schreiben: „Der auf Kunst bezogene Schriftverkehr von Hans Heinrich (…) ist ab 1960 systematisch überliefert“ und „Wer federführend für die Bewegungen in den Sammlungsbeständen der 1950er Jahre verantwortlich war, ist mangels Quellen nicht sicher zu sagen“, da es sonst schwierig zu erklären wäre, wie ein Mann, dessen Besitz bis 1955 enteignet gewesen sein soll, davor teure Kunst kaufen und damit handeln konnte?

Wurde Dr Gramlich beauftragt weil ein Mann mit so wenig Erfahrung, von „APC“ als einem „amerikanischen Unternehmen“ schreiben kann, mit dem Heini Thyssens Firma Verhandlungen geführt habe, da er nicht weiss, dass sich hinter dem Kürzel der „Alien Property Custodian“ (also der Treuhänder für ausländisches Eigentum) verbirgt? Oder weil er immer und immer wieder die unglaubliche Qualität der Thyssen Sammlungen anpreist, obwohl klar zu werden scheint, dass viele der Bilder, inklusive Heinrich’s „Vermeer“ und „Dürer“ und Fritz’s „Rembrandt“ und „Fragonard“ gefälscht waren? Die Lost Art Koordinierungssstelle in Magdeburg beschreibt diesen Fragonard übrigens als seit Juni 1945 aus Marburg verschollen, aber Gramlich sagt, das Bild sei bis 1965 in der Sammlung Fritz Thyssen in München gewesen und erst seitdem, nachdem es “nur noch mit 3,000 DM (bewertet wurde) da (… seine) Originalität für fragwürdig (erachtet wurde)”, verschollen.

An einer Stelle schreibt Gramlich über zwei Bilder von Albrecht Dürer in der Sammlung Thyssen-Bornemisza, ohne jedoch ihre Titel zu verraten. Er beschreibt, dass das eine von Heini Thyssen 1948 verkauft wurde. Es ging an den Amerikanischen Sammler Samuel H Kress und schließlich an die Nationalgalerie in Washington. Was Gramlich nicht sagt, ist dass dies „Madonna mit Kind“ war. Das andere Bild ist in der Sammlung Thyssen-Bornemisza verblieben und kann heute noch im Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum in Madrid unter dem Titel „Jesus unter den Schriftgelehrten“ bestaunt werden. Es hat allerdings eine äusserst negative Beurteilung durch den bekannten Dürer-Experten Dr Thomas Schauerte erhalten; Johannes Gramlich, jedoch, lässt seine Leser darüber im Dunkeln.

Die Wahrheit in all dem ist, dass egal wie viele Bücher und Artikel noch darüber geschrieben werden (und es waren bisher schon viele), die behaupten, Heini Thyssen habe Werke des deutschen Expressionismus gekauft, weil er zeigen wollte, wie sehr er gegen die Nazis war, dies nach Ende der Nazi-Periode überhaupt nicht möglich und auch noch nicht einmal glaubhaft ist. Es ist Unfug, zu behaupten, August Thyssen habe Kaiser Wilhelm II als „ein Unglück für unser Volk“ betrachtet, denn er hatte sein Bildnis an der Wand hängen und kaufte sich 1916 mit der einzigen Absicht in den U-Boot-Bauer Bremer Vulkan ein, noch mehr vom Krieg des Kaisers zu profitieren. Und es ist auch nicht glaubhaft, angesichts des tief empfundenen Anti-Semitismus des Fritz Thyssen, zu sagen, er habe Jakob Goldschmidt 1934 geholfen, einen Teil seiner Kunstsammlung ausser Landes zu bringen, weil er solch ein treuer Freund dieses jüdischen Mannes gewesen sei. Fritz Thyssen half Jakob Goldschmidt obwohl er Jude war und nur deshalb, weil dieser ein unglaublich gut vernetzter und daher ein unabdingbarer Partner im internationalen Bankverkehr war – der seinerseits nach dem zweiten Weltkrieg den Thyssens half, der vollumfänglichen alliierten Vergeltung zu entgehen.

Alles, was die Thyssens je mit Kunst getan haben – und dieses Buch bestätigt dies, obwohl es eigentlich versucht, das Gegenteil zu tun – war es, die Kunst zu benutzen, um nicht nur ihre zu versteuernden Vermögenswerte zu tarnen, sondern auch sich selbst. Sie haben die Kunst benutzt, um die fragwürdige Teil-Quelle ihres Reichtums zu verschleiern, sowie die Tatsache, dass sie Emporkömmlinge waren. Genauso wie Professor Manfred Rasch kein unabhängiger Historiker ist, sondern nichts weiter als eine Thyssensche Archivkraft (die Art, wie er seine „akademischen“ Mitarbeiter dazu benutzt, um verächtliche Bemerkungen über unsere Arbeit zu plazieren ist sehr unprofessionell), so waren und sind die Thyssens weder „Autodidakten“ noch „Kunstkenner“, und werden es nie sein. Der Grund dafür ist, dass Kunst sich nicht auf der Unterschriftenlinie eines Überweisungsauftrags abspielt und in ihrer wahren Essenz das genaue Gegenteil von praktisch allem ist, wofür die Thyssens, mit ein paar Ausnahmen, jemals gestanden haben.

Wie es Max Friedländer zusammenfasste, war ihre Einstellung die der „eitlen Begierde“, des „gesellschaftlichen Ehrgeizes“, der „Spekulation auf Wertsteigerung“……des Wunsches “seinen Besitz zur Schau zu stellen“…..“dass die Bewunderung, die (die) Kunstwerke in den Gästen, den Besuchern erweckten, auf (den Sammler), als auf den glücklichen Eigentümer, auf den kultivierten Kunstfreund, zurückstrahlte“. Entgegen der besten Bemühungen der Thyssen Machinerie eine zuträgliche, akademische Auseinandersetzung mit den Thyssenschen Kunstsammlungsbestrebungen zu präsentieren, haben die Beteuerungen sowohl der ästhetischen Qualität, als auch des Anlagewerts ihrer „Kunstsammlungen“, die hier so ekelerregend oft geäussert werden, angesichts der unendlich unmoralischen Standards der betroffenen Personen keinerlei Relevanz. Das Einzige was zählt, ist dass das Ausmaß des Thyssenschen industriellen Vermögens so gigantisch war, dass die reflektierende Fläche für den persönlichen Schein der Eigentümer, wie den ihrer Kunst endlos groß war. Und deshalb scheiterte ihre geplante Tarnung durch Kultur was v.a. die Thyssens der zweiten Generation als Philister bloßstellte.

 

Johannes Gramlich

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in The Thyssen Art Macabre, Thyssen Art, Thyssen Corporate, Thyssen Family No Comments »

Book Review: Thyssen in the 20th Century – Volume 3: “The Thyssens as Art Collectors. Investment and Symbolic Capital (1900-1970)”, by Johannes Gramlich, published by Schöningh Verlag, Germany, 2015

After the ducking and diving and profiteering from other peoples’ death and misery, we will now be looking at the „shinier“ side of the medal, which is the so-called „artistic effort“ alleged to have been made by the Thyssen family. This had more to do with capital flight, the circumvention of foreign exchange controls and the avoidance of paying tax (art collections being described by Gramlich as „a valid means of decreasing tax duties as they are difficult to control“), short-term speculation, capital protection and profit maximisation than it did with any serious appreciation, let alone creation, of art.

Significantly, not a single review of this third book in the series „Thyssen in the 20th Century: The Thyssens as Art Collectors“, which once again constitutes nothing more than the shortened version (at 400 pages!) of a doctoral thesis – this time at the University of Munich – has been posted. Not a single suggestion that this student of history, german and music might not know what he is talking about, since he does not seem to have any previous knowledge of art history or obvious personal talents in the visual arts. Or about the fact that way too much of the art bought by the Thyssens was rubbish. Or that the Thyssens pretended to be Hungarian when they wanted something from Hungary, Swiss when they wanted something from Switzerland, or Dutch when they wanted something from the Netherlands.

In fact if there is one overall message this book appears to propagate it is this: that it is the ultimate achievement to cheat persistently, and as long as you are rich and powerful and immoral enough to continue cheating and myth-making all through your life, you will be just fine. Not least because you can then leave enough money in an endowment to continue to facilitate the burnishing of your reputation, so that the myth-making can continue on your behalf, posthumously. And if by any chance you can take advantage of another person’s distress along the way, so much the better – as Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza is said to have done from the Jewish collections of Herbert Gutmann and Max Alsberg and Fritz Thyssen from those of Julius Kien and Maximilian von Goldschmidt-Rothschild.

But: does anybody find this message acceptable?!

Mysteriously, this book also contains some very derogatory descriptions of the Thyssens’ true characters. Fritz Thyssen is described (in a quote by Christian Nebenhay) as „not very impressive“ and „meaningless“. His brother Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza is said to have been „difficult“, „unpleasant“, „avaricious“, „not always straight in his payment behaviour“ and somebody who „could not find the understanding for needs and aspirations of people who were in a relationship of dependency from him“. Amelie Thyssen is said to have tried to get the historical record bent very seriously as far her husband’s alleged distancing from Nazism was concerned and to have lied about the date of art purchases to avoid the payment of tax.

Fortunately, we did not know any of these second-generation Thyssens personally. But we did know Heini Thyssen, the last directly descended male Thyssen heir, and very well at that. Over the period of some 25 years (Litchfield more than Schmitz) we were lucky enough to be able to spend altogether many months in his company. We both liked and miss him greatly. He was a delightful man with a great sense of humour and sparkling intelligence. What was most astonishing about him, considering his family’s general sense of superiority, was his total lack of arrogance.

Heini Thyssen described the art business to us as „the dirtiest business in the world“. He knew of the secret-mongering of dealers, the hyperboles of auction houses and the dishonesties of experts. It was a choppy sea that he navigated with just the right combination of caution and bravado to be successful. But of course, he also used the art business outrageously in order to invent a new image for himself. The reason why, contrary to his father and uncle, he was extremely successful in this endeavour, was precisely because he was such a likeable man.

But this did not make Heini Thyssen a moral man. He continued to cheat about his nationality, the source and extent of his fortune, his responsibilities and his loyalties just as his father, uncle and aunt (and to some extent his grand-father) had done before him. And now, this series of books continues to perpetuate the very same old myths which have always been necessary to cover the tracks of these robber barons for as long as the modern-day German nation state has existed. The size and claimed value of the Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection also persuaded many members of the international art community and of the general public to accept this duplicity.

The all important Thyssen-owned dutch Bank voor Handel en Scheepvaart, for instance, is repeatedly said to have been founded in 1918, when the real date is most likely to have been 1910. This is important because the bank was the primary offshore tool used by the Thyssens to camouflage their German assets and protect their concern and fortune from allied retribution after the first lost war. But the information is precarious because it also implies a massive disloyalty of the Thyssens towards Germany, the country that was, is and always will be the sole original source of their fortune.

And again Heinrich and Heini Thyssen are said to have been Hungarian nationals, presumably because it is meant to excuse why, despite supporting the Nazi war machine that made possible some of the worst atrocities in human history, the Thyssen-Bornemiszas entirely avoided allied retribution after the second lost war also. In reality, Heinrich Thyssen’s Hungarian nationality was highly questionable, for several reasons: because it was originally „bought“, was not maintained through regular visits to the abandoned country, extension papers were issued by Thyssen-sponsored friends and relatives in diplomatic positions and because Heinrich actually maintained his German nationality. In Heini’s case, his status depended entirely on the fact that his mother’s second husband worked at the Hungarian embassy in Berne and procured him the necessary identity papers (a fact that will be plagiarised from our work by „Junior Research Group Leader“ Simone Derix in her forthcoming book on the Thyssens’ fortune and identity, which is based on her habilitation thesis (!) and as such already available – Strangely, despite being volume 4 in the series, her book is now said to be published only following volume 5). To call those Hungarian nationalities legitimate is plainly wrong. And it matters greatly.

When Philip Hendy at the London National Gallery put on an exhibition of paintings from Heini Thyssen’s collection in 1961, Heini apparently told Hendy he could not possibly be showing during the same year as Emil Bührle, because “As you know Bührle was a real German armament king who became Swiss, so it would be very bad for me to get linked up with German armament“. But this was not, as this book makes it sound, because Heini Thyssen did not have anything to do with German armament himself, but precisely because he did! Since this partial source of the Thyssen wealth has now been admitted by both Alexander Donges and Thomas Urban, it is highly questionable that Johannes Gramlich fails to acknowledge this adequately in his work.

Then there are new acknowledgments such as the fact that August Thyssen and Auguste Rodin did not have a close friendship as described in all relevant books so far, but that their relationship was terrible, because of monetary squabbles, artistic incomprehension and public relations opportunism. The only problem with this admission is that, once again, we were the first to establish this reality. Now this book is committing shameless plagiarism on our investigative effort and, under the veil of disallowing us as not pertaining to the „academic“ circle, is claiming the „academic merit“ of being the first to reveal this information for itself.

Another one of our revelations, which is being confirmed in this book, is that the 1930 Munich exhibition of Heinrich’s collection was a disaster, because so many of the works shown were discovered to be fraudulent. Luitpold Dussler in the Bayerischer Kurier and Kunstwart art magazine; Wilhelm Pinder at the Munich Art Historical Society; Rudolf Berliner; Leo Planiscig; Armand Lowengard at Duveen Brothers and Hans Tietze all made very derogatory assessments of the Baron’s collection as „expensive hobby“, „with obviously wrong attributions“, containing „over 100 forgeries, falsified paintings and impossible artist names“, where „the Baron could throw away half the objects“, „400 paintings none of which you should buy today“, „backward looking collection“, „off-putting designations“, „misleading“, „rubbish“, etc. etc. etc. The Baron retaliated by getting the „right-wing press“ (!) in particular to write positive articles about his so-called artistic endeavours, patriotic deed and philanthropic largesse, an altruistic attitude which was not based on fact but solely on Thyssen-financed public relations inputs.

The book almost completely leaves out Heini Thyssen’s art activities which is puzzling since he was by far the most important collector within the dynasty. Instead, a lot of information is relayed which has nothing whatsoever to do with art, such as the fact that Fritz Thyssen bought Schloss Puchhof estate and that it was run by Willi Grünberg. In the words of Gramlich: „Fritz Thyssen advised (Grünberg) to get the maximum out of the farm without consideration for sustainability. As a consequence the land was totally depleted afterwards. The denazification court however came to the conclusion that these methods of exhaustive cultivation were due mainly to the manager who was doing it to get more profit for himself“. Apparently Grünberg also abused at least 100 POWs there during the war but, after a short period of post-war examination, was reinstated as estate manager by Fritz Thyssen. This gives an indication not only of the failings of the denazification proceedings, but also of Thyssen’s concepts of human rights and the non-applicability of general laws to people of his standing.

One is also left wondering why Fritz Thyssen would be said to have bought the biggest estate in Bavaria in 1938, for an over-priced 2 million RM, specifically for his daughter Anita Zichy-Thyssen and son-in-law Gabor Zichy to live in, when Heini Thyssen and his cousin Barbara Stengel told us very specifically that the Zichy-Thyssens, with the help of Hermann Göring, for whom Anita had worked as his personal secretary, left Germany to live in Argentina in 1938, being transported there aboard a German naval vessel. After repeating the old myth that Anita’s family was with her parents when they fled Germany on the eve of World War Two, this book now makes the additional „revelation“ that Anita and her family arrived in Argentina in February 1940, without, however, explaining where they might have been in the meantime, while Fritz and Amelie Thyssen were taken back to Germany by the Gestapo. Of course February 1940 is also the date when Fritz and Amelie, of whom Anita would inherit, were stripped of their German citizenship, a fact that was to become crucial in them being able to regain their German assets after the war.

The defensive attitude of this book is also revealed when Eduard von der Heydt, another Nazi banker, war profiteer and close art investment advisor to the Thyssens, is said to be „still deeply rooted and present in (the Ruhr) in positive connotations, despite all protest and difficulties“. This has to refer not least to the fact – but for some reason does not spell it out – that some Germans, mindful of his role as a Nazi banker, have managed to get the name of the cultural prize of the town of Wuppertal-Elberfeld, where the von der Heydt Museum stands, changed from Eduard von der Heydt Prize to Von der Heydt Prize. Clearly because Willi Grünberg was but a foot soldier and Eduard von der Heydt a wealthy cosmopolitan, Grünberg gets the bad press while von der Heydt receives the diplomatic treatment, in the same way as book 2 of the series (on forced labour) blames managers and foremen and practically exonerates the Thyssens. It is a distorting way of working through Nazi history which should no longer be happening. Meanwhile, Johannes Gramlich is allowed to reveal that in view of revolutionary turmoils in Germany in 1931, Fritz Thyssen sent his collection to Switzerland only for it to be brought back to Germany in the summer of 1933 – as if a stronger indication could possibly be had for his deep satisfaction with Hitler’s ascent to power.

In the same period, Heinrich, after his disastrous 1930 Munich exhibition, teased the Düsseldorf Museum with a „non-committal prospect“ to loan them his collection for a number of years. It is also said that he planned to build an „August Thyssen House“ in Düsseldorf to house his collection permanently. Considering the time and huge effort Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza spent during his entire life and beyond on not being considered a German, it is strange that Johannes Gramlich does not qualify this venture as being either a fake plan or proof of Heinrich’s hidden teutonic loyalties. In view of the dismal quality of Heinrich’s art there was of course no real collection worth being shown at the Düsseldorf Museum at all, which did not, however, stop its Director Dr Karl Koetschau from lobbying for it for years. He was disappointed at Heinrich’s behaviour of stringing them along, which is an episode that leaves even Gramlich to concede: „(the Baron) accepted all benefits and gave nothing in return“. While the „Schloss Rohoncz Collection“ is said to have arrived at his private residence in Lugano from 1934, this book still fails to inform us of the precise timing and logistics of the transfer (some 500 paintings), a grave omission for which there is no excuse. It is also worth remembering that 1934 was the year Switzerland implemented its bank secrecy law, which would have been the ultimate reason why Heinrich chose Lugano as final seat of his „art collection“.

The many painfully obvious omissions in this book are revealing, particularly in the case of Heini Thyssen having a bust made of himself by the artist Nison Tregor when the fact that he also had one made by Arno Breker, Hitler’s favourite sculptor, is left out. But they become utterly inacceptable in the case of the silence about the „aryanisation“ of the Erlenhof stud farm in 1933 (from Oppenheimer to Thyssen-Bornemisza) or the involvement of Margit Batthyany-Thyssen, together with her SS-lovers, in the atrocity on 180 Jewish slave labourers at the SS-requisitioned but Thyssen-funded Rechnitz castle estate in March 1945. Both matters continue to remain persistently unmentioned and thus form cases of Holocaust denial which are akin to the efforts of one David Irving.

It is also astonishing how the author seems to have a desperate need for mystifying the question of the financing of Heinrich Thyssen’s collection, when Heini Thyssen told us very clearly that his father did this through a loan from his own bank, Bank voor Handel en Scheepvaart. This fact is very straightforward, yet Johannes Gramlich makes it sound so complicated that one can only think this must be because he wants to make it appear like Thyssen had money available in some kind of holy grail-like golden pot somewhere that had nothing to do with Thyssen companies and confirmed that he really was descended from some ancient, aristocratic line as he would have liked (and in his own head believed!) to have done.

The equally unlikely fact is purported that all the details of every single one of the several thousand pieces of art purchased by the Thyssens has been entered by „the team“ into a huge database containing a sophisticated network of cross-referenced information. Yet, in the whole of this book, the author mentions only a handful of the actual contents of Thyssen pictures. Time and time again the reader is left with the burning question: why, as the subject was so important to the Thyssens, did they leave it to such an unenlightened man rather than an experienced art historian to write about it? Is it because it is easier to get such a person to write statements such as “personal documents (of Fritz Thyssen) were destroyed during the confiscation of his fortune by the National Socialists and his business documents were mainly destroyed by WWII bombing“, because the organisation does not want to publish the true details of Fritz and Amelie’s wartime life? (one small tip: the bad bad Nazis threw them in a concentration camp and left them to rot is definitely not what happened). Or because he is prepared to write: „The correspondence of Hans Heinrich (Heini Thyssen) referring to art has been transmitted systematically from 1960 onwards“ and „for lack of sources, it is not possible to establish who was responsible for the movements in the collection inventory during the 1950s“ , because for a man whose assets are alleged to have been expropriated until 1955, it would be difficult to explain why he was able to buy and deal with expensive art before then?

Was Dr Gramlich commissioned because a man with his lack of experience can write about „APC“ being an American company that Heini Thyssen’s company was “negotiating with”, because he does not know that the letters stand for „Alien Property Custodian“? Or because time and time and time again he will praise the „outstanding quality“ of the Thyssens’ collections, despite the fact that far too many pictures, including Heinrich’s „Vermeer“ and „Dürer“ or Fritz’s „Rembrandt“ and „Fragonard“ turned out to be fakes? The Lost Art Coordination Point in Magdeburg, by the way, describes this Fragonard as having been missing since 1945 from Marburg. But Gramlich says it has been missing since 1965 from the Fritz Thyssen Collection in Munich, when it was “only valued at 3.000 Deutschmarks any longer, because its originality was now questioned”.

At one point, Gramlich writes about the „two paintings by Albrecht Dürer“ in the Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection without naming either of them. He describes that one of them was sold by Heini Thyssen in 1948. It went to the American art collector Samuel H Kress and finally to the Washington National Gallery. What Gramlich does not say is that this was in fact “Madonna with Child“. The other one remained in the Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection and can still be viewed at the Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum in Madrid to this day under the title „Jesus among the Scribes“. Only, it has received a highly damning appraisal by one of the world’s foremost Dürer experts, Dr Thomas Schauerte; Johannes Gramlich does not tell his readers about this.

The truth in all this is that no matter how many books and articles (and there have been many!) are financed by Thyssen money to tell us that Heini Thyssen bought German expressionist art in order to show how „anti-Nazi“ he was, such a thing is not actually possible and is not even believable after the Nazi period. It is ludicrous to say that August Thyssen saw Kaiser Wilhelm II as „Germany’s downfall“, since he had the Kaiser’s picture on his wall and started buying into the Bremer Vulkan submarine- producing shipyard in 1916, specifically in order to profit from the Kaiser’s war. And it is not believable, in view of Fritz Thyssen’s deeply-held antisemitism, to say he helped Jakob Goldschmidt to take some of his art out of Germany in 1934, because he was such a loyal friend of this Jewish man. Fritz Thyssen helped Jakob Goldschmidt despite him being Jewish and only because Goldschmidt was an incredibly well-connected and thus indispensable international banker – who in turn helped the Thyssens save their assets from allied retribution after WWII.

All the Thyssens have ever done with art – and this book, despite aiming to do the contrary, does in fact confirm it – is to have used art in order to camouflage not just their taxable assets, but themselves as well. They have used art to hide the problematic source of parts of their fortune, as well as the fact they were simple parvenus. In the same way as Professor Manfred Rasch is not an independent historian but only a Thyssen filing clerk (the way he repeatedly gets his „academic“ underlings to include disrespectful remarks about us in their work is highly unprofessional), so the Thyssens are not, never have been and never will be „autodidactic“ „connoisseurs“. And that is because art does not happen on a cheque book signature line but is, in its very essence, the exact opposite of just about anything the Thyssens, with a few exceptions, have ever stood for.

As Max Friedländer summarised it, their kind of attitude was that of: „the vain desire, social ambition, speculation for rise in value….of ostentatiously presenting one’s assets…..so that this admiration of the assets reflects back on the owner himself“. Despite the best efforts of the Thyssen machine to present a favourable academic evaluation of the Thyssens’ art collecting jaunts, in view of their infinitely immoral standards, the assurances of both the aesthetic qualities and investment value of their „art collections“, as mentioned so nauseatingly frequently in this book, are of no consequence whatsoever. The only thing that is relevant is that the extent of the family’s industrial wealth was so vast, that the pool of pretence for both them and their art was limitless. Thus their intended camouflage through culture failed and the second-generation Thyssens in particular ended up being exposed as Philistines.

Johannes Gramlich

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in The Thyssen Art Macabre, Thyssen Art, Thyssen Corporate, Thyssen Family No Comments »

Buchrezension: Thyssen im 20. Jahrhundert – Band 1: “Die Vereinigte Stahlwerke AG im Nationalsozialismus, Konzernpolitik zwischen Marktwirtschaft und Staatswirtschaft”, von Alexander Donges, erschienen im Schöningh Verlag, Paderborn, 2014.

Dieses Buch über das “Gemeinschaftsunternehmen zu dem Unternehmen der Thyssen-Gruppe zählten” beginnt mit der Aussage des Autors, es sei “erstaunlich, dass sich die moderne unternehmenshistorische Forschung noch nicht intensiver mit der Entwicklung des Konzerns in den Jahren 1933 bis 1945 auseinandergesetzt hat”. Offensichtlich wurde die in unserem Buch enthaltene, unabhängige wissenschaftliche Information nicht anerkannt, obwohl sie Auslöser dafür war, dass Dr. Donges und seine akademischen Kollegen mit dem Umschreiben der Thyssen Geschichte beauftragt und dafür gefördert wurden.

Erst in der Mitte des 400-Seiten schweren Traktats rückt er schließlich damit heraus, dass die Vereinigten Stahlwerke (VSt, Vestag) massiv im Rüstungsgeschäft tätig waren, aber dass “in der Forschung (dies) bislang nicht hinreichend beachtet (wurde), sodass die Vestag im Gegensatz zu Unternehmen wie dem Krupp-Konzern eher als Roheisen- und Rohstahlproduzent wahrgenommen wird”.

Die Entscheidung, wie man auf solche ganz offensichtlich manipulierten Behauptungen reagieren soll fällt schwer und wir fragen uns, ob es Dr Donges jemals in den Sinn gekommen ist, dass die Dimensionen der bisherigen fälschlichen Darstellung so bedeutsam sind, dass der Schluss auf der Hand liegt, dass sie nicht zufällig sondern absichtlich zustande kam.

Da die Thyssens zusammen mit dem Deutschen Staat zu Beginn von Hitler’s Diktatur 72,5% der Vereinigten Stahlwerke kontrollierten, und deren Ausstoß drei Mal so groß war wie der ihres größten Konkurrenten, war es stets unlogisch, dass Alfried Krupp im Nürnberger Prozeß zu einer Haftstrafe verurteilt wurde, während die Thyssens ungeschoren davon kamen. Sie konnten dies aus vielen verschiedenen Gründen, die in unserem Buch ausführlich beschrieben werden, und so wurde der Mythos ihrer heldenmütigen Unbeflecktheit erschaffen.

Es ist offensichtlich, dass die akademische und die Medienwelt in Deutschland willens waren, diesem Mythos zu folgen statt ihn zu hinterfragen, wie wir es getan haben. Zu ihrer Verteidigung mögen sie anführen, dass sie gewisse Dokumente nicht einsehen konnten und ihre Forschungen dadurch behindert waren. Doch während die Archive der Thyssen-Bornemiszas tatsächlich bis vor kurzem für die akademische Welt unzugänglich waren, bestand für die Akten des 53-Jahre alten ThyssenKrupp Archivs keinerlei Zugangsbeschränkung (offiziell jedenfalls nicht; die Wahrheit steht auf einem anderen Blatt).

Als Georg Thyssen-Bornemisza ca. 2006/7 die Stiftung zur Industriegeschichte Thyssen ins Leben rief und ihr die Archive seines Vaters übergab (welche wir zuvor privat in Madrid und später in Monte Carlo eingesehen hatten), unterstellte er diese der fragwürdigen Pflegschaft von Prof. Manfred Rasch, Leiter des Archivs der ThyssenKrupp AG und sogar, so scheint es, zur Aufbewahrung im selben Gebäude in Duisburg, welches das ThyssenKrupp Archiv enthält.

Dieser erstaunliche Transfer hatte zur Folge, dass die Akten der Familie Fritz Thyssen mit den Akten der Familie Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza symbolisch vereinigt wurden; ein unglaublicher Akt, wenn man bedenkt, wie wichtig es für die Aufrechterhaltung des geschichtlichen Thyssen-Mythos war, stets zu betonen, dass die eine Seite der Familie mit der anderen Seite nichts zu tun hatte – ein Mythos, den die drei ersten Bücher dieser Reihe nichtsdestotrotz weiter fortsetzen.

Bei näherer Einsicht der Bestände, jedoch, scheinen kuriose interne Restrukturierungen der Akten in den beiden Archiven vorzugehen. Da sind zum einen wichtige Akten, von denen wir wissen, dass sie vormals im ThyssenKrupp Archiv waren, wie z.B. (erstaunlicherweise) der Nachlass von Wilhelm Roelen (Hauptmanager von Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza) oder der Nachlass von Robert Ellscheid (Hauptanwalt von Fritz und Amélie Thyssen) und von denen jetzt behauptet wird, sie befänden sich im Archiv der neuen Stiftung zur Industriegeschichte Thyssen.

Was aber besonders aus den Fußnoten hervorsticht ist, dass immer und immer wieder wenn es speziell um militärische Rüstung geht, die Akten meist aus dem Archiv der neuen Stiftung zur Industriegeschichte Thyssen stammen sollen, und nicht aus dem der ThyssenKrupp AG, sodass man das Gefühl bekommt, hier könnte eventuell eine Schadensbegrenzung zugunsten des kränkelnden Riesen der deutschen Schwerindustrie im Gange sein.

Auf alle Fälle ist eines der wenigen, bedeutenden Eingeständnisse dieses Buches, dass die Flucht Fritz Thyssens von Deutschland in die Schweiz bei Ausbruch des Zweiten Weltkriegs weniger mit heroischer Auflehnung gegen Hitler, und mehr mit der Tatsache zu tun gehabt haben könnte, dass er massiv gegen Devisenbestimmungen verstoßen und Steuern hinterzogen hatte, von der wir zuerst berichteten (obschon es nichts über weitere Gründe für seine Flucht aussagt, wie zum Beispiel Hitlers erniedrigende Anschuldigung des Eigennutzes).

Während Dr Donges die Verfehlungen Fritz Thyssens in Zahlen festhält, nämlich 31 Millionen Reichsmark in hinterzogenen Steuern plus 17 Millionen RM Reichsfluchtsteuer, also ein Gesamtbetrag von 48 Million RM, der an den deutschen Staat zu zahlen gewesen wären, mildert er die Aussage ab, indem er behauptet, das Entnazifizierungsverfahren von 1948 sei nicht zu dem Schluss gekommen, dass dieser Aspekt eine wichtige Rolle bei Fritz Thyssens Flucht gespielt habe. Dr Donges unterlässt es jedoch, diesen Beweis zu qualifizieren – wie es andere Autoren in dieser Reihe tun – und darauf hinzuweisen, dass die ehrliche Aufarbeitung durch diese Gerichte zum Erliegen kam sobald der Kalte Krieg begann.

Es ist auch bemerkenswert, dass der Autor behauptet die kritische Steuerfahndung in Sachen Fritz Thyssen habe Ende der Zwanziger Jahre begonnen, obwohl diese in Wirklichkeit bereits bald nach dem Ersten Weltkrieg ihren Anfang nahm.

Das Buch bringt es fertig, zu veröffentlichen, dass die zurückgezogen lebende Joseph Thyssen Seite der Familie (vom Bruder des alten August Thyssens abstammend) indirekt von der Verfolgung von Juden profitierte, da das Reich ihnen nach Fritz Thyssens Flucht und der Beschlagnahmung seines Vermögens, den Wert ihrer VSt-Aktien, nämlich 54 Million RM, mit Aktien aus jüdischem Besitz erstattete, die durch die Judenvermögensabgabe an das Reich gekommen waren.

Aber es war Fritz Thyssen, dessen Anti-Semitismus offensichtlich war, während er in prominenter Position 1933/4 daran beteiligt war, die jüdischen Mitglieder Paul Silverberg, Jakob Goldschmidt, Kurt Martin Hirschland, Henry Nathan, Georg Solmssen und Ottmar E Strauss aus dem Aufsichtsrat der VSt zu drängen. Und ganz gleich wie oft man in dieser Serie versuchen wird, uns weiszumachen, dass Fritz Thyssen sich nach 1934 “selbst stufenweise ent-nazifierte” und dass seine Judenfeindlichkeit nicht von der bösartigen, mörderischen Art war, so müssen wir uns daran erinnern, dass die wirtschaftliche Entrechtung der Juden den ersten Schritt auf dem Weg zum Holocaust darstellt.

Als die Simon Hirschland Bank in Essen 1938 “arisiert” und von einem Konsortium übernommen wurde, an dem die Deutsche Bank und die Essener National-Bank AG beteiligt waren, kaufte Fritz Thyssen einen Anteil von 0.5 Millionen RM, aber seine Rolle wird als “fraglich” bezeichnet und gesagt, dass “in der Forschung nur ungenau beantwortet (wird) welche Rolle Thyssen bei der Gründung dieses ‘Arisierungs-Konsortiums’ spielte”. Dies ist eine Methode, mit der Akademiker Zweifel an etablierten Einschätzungen aussähen, vor allem wenn diese für die Thyssens rufschädigend sind und sie von ihnen beim Umschreiben ihrer Geschichte gefördert werden.

Natürlich bleibt die sehr wichtige Finanz- und Bankenseite der Fragestellung genauso unterbelichtet, wie sie es zur Zeit des Geschehens war. Dr Donges erwähnt anonyme Holdings in den Niederlanden, der Schweiz und in den USA; dass das Reich die Rüstungsfinanzierung über die Metallurgische Forschungsanstalt verschleierte; und Faminta AG im schweizerischen Glarus, von dem er behauptet, es sei ein ausländisches Instrument der Thyssen & Co., nicht von Fritz Thyssen persönlich, gewesen. Er nennt nicht die Namen der amerikanischen Anleihegläubiger und sagt aus, dass die Rolle des Finanzministeriums im Dritten Reich noch nicht ausreichend erforscht worden ist.

Und während Dr Donges auf Seite 28 in oberflächlichster Weise informiert, dass nach dem Tod des Patriarchen August Thyssen 1926, Fritz Thyssen seinem Bruder Heinrich “einen Teil” der VSt Aktien abtreten musste (es waren anfänglich nicht weniger als 55 Millionen RM, für die er im Gegenzug Anteile an der Familien-eigenen Bank voor Handel en Scheepvaart in Rotterdam erhielt, die von Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza kontrolliert wurde), beschreibt er nirgends, wie lange dieser Anteil wohl im Besitz von Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza verblieb und ob er sich noch in seinem Besitz befand, als das Vermögen von Fritz Thyssen 1939/40 konfisziert wurde (und falls ja, was dann damit geschah).

Statt dessen konzentriert sich der Autor auf die “Nutzung von politischen, rechtlichen und gesellschaftlichen Optionen für den wirtschaftlichen Erfolg” in der NS-Zeit. Er veranschaulicht “die unternehmerischen Vorteile des Ausbaus der Rüstungsbetriebe” und stellt fest: “Auch wenn die Handlungsspielräume im Vergleich mit der Weimarer Republik aufgrund zahlreicher Restriktionen eingeschränkt waren, konnte die Konzernleitung (der VSt) weiterhin eine langfristig ausgerichtete Investitionsstrategie verfolgen.”

Und so endet das Buch mit der weltbewegenden Schlussfolgerung: “Betrachtet man die Entwicklungslinien der deutschen Stahlindustrie im 20. Jahrhundert, so bewegten sich die Stahlerzeuger im langfristigen Trend hin zur Weiterverarbeitung. Daher wäre die Vestag (Vereinigte Stahlwerke AG) in den 1930er Jahren wohl auch unter einem anderen politischen Regime diesen Weg gegangen”.

So muss man annehmen, dass dies der Hauptgrund für dieses Werk war: das Image der ThyssenKrupp AG und das Gewissen überlebender Mitglieder der Thyssen-Familie, die von der Rolle der Vereinigten Stahlwerke AG beim Tod von 80 Millionen Menschen als Auswirkung des Zweiten Weltkriegs profitiert haben – und dies noch tun – sauber zu halten.

Es ist nicht ersichtlich, wie Dr Donges mit seiner Doktorarbeit tatsächlich die Forschungslücke zum Thema Vereinigte Stahlwerke in der Nazi-Periode auch nur annähernd “schließen” könnte, wie in der Missionsaussage zur Projektreihe “Familie – Unternehmen – Öffentlichkeit. Thyssen im 20. Jahrhundert” zu lesen steht.

Ob jemand ausserhalb des Zirkels der offensichtlich Thyssen-finanzierten Forscher in Folge dessen aus dem “großen, bedingungslosen Schlummer” erwachen und beschließen wird, eine etwas kritischere Forschung zu betreiben, wird sich zeigen. Akademische Buchrezensionen (z. B. von Tobias Birken bei Sehepunkte, oder Tim Schanetzky bei H-Soz-Kult) lassen bisher nicht viel Hoffnung auf eine wirklich kritische Auseinandersetzung aufkommen. In jedem Falle ist es eine ganz andere Frage, wie abweichende Akademiker empfangen würden, wenn sie an die Tür der “Archive des Professors Rasch” anklopften.

Der Volkswirt (Dr.) Alexander Donges, wie er seinen Titel an der Universität Mannheim als akademischer Thyssen-Söldner verdient

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in The Thyssen Art Macabre, Thyssen Corporate, Thyssen Family No Comments »

Book Review: Thyssen in the 20th century – Volume 1: „The United Steelworks under National Socialism, Concern Politics between Market Economy and State Economy“, by Alexander Donges, published by Schöningh Verlag, Germany, 2014.

This book begins with the author expressing his „astonishment“ at the fact that the entrepreneurial, Nazi period history of the United Steelworks (Vereinigte Stahlwerke, VSt) – a conglomerate which included Thyssen works – has not so far been properly researched by academia. Obviously, the independent scholarly information contained in our book has not been considered worthy of acknowledgment, regardless of the fact that it was as a direct result of its publication that Dr Donges and his fellow academic authors have been commissioned and funded to rewrite the Thyssens’ history.

Not until half way through the 400-page tome does he finally acknowledge that VSt was massively involved in armaments manufacture, but that, instead of perceiving this adequately, academia until now has rather viewed VSt as a mere raw iron and raw steel producer – in stark contrast to the Krupp-concern.

While it is difficult to know how to react to such obviously manipulated claims, this reviewer wonders whether it might ever occur to Dr Donges that the dimensions of previous mis-representations are such that it takes minimal intelligence to conclude that they must have been the result of intent rather than accident.

Considering that by the onset of Hitler’s dictatorship, the Thyssens, together with the German state, controlled 72,5% of VSt, and VSt’s output was three times the size of that of its biggest competitor, it was always illogical that Alfried Krupp was sentenced to prison at the Nuremberg Trials while the Thyssens got off scot-free. But for many and various reasons, explained at length in our book, they did, and there the myth of their quasi-heroic immaculacy began to be established.

It is apparent that German academia and the German media were prepared to follow this myth instead of, as we did, questioning it. In their defense they might argue that they were not able to view certain archives and that this has hampered their research. But while the Thyssen-Bornemiszas’ files have indeed been unavailable to academia until recently, for the past 53 years of their existence the ThyssenKrupp archives – officially at least (the truth is another matter) – have not been subject to such restrictions.

When at some point around 2006/7 Georg Thyssen-Bornemisza created the Thyssen Industrial History Foundation and placed in it his father’s archives (which we had previously viewed in private, first in Madrid and later in Monte Carlo), he effectively placed them under the questionable curatorship of Prof. Manfred Rasch, head archivist of ThyssenKrupp AG, and even, it seems, in the same building as the ThyssenKrupp archives in Duisburg.

This move did the extraordinary thing of symbolically uniting the files of Fritz Thyssen’s side with those of Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza’s side of the family; a momentous act, since it was a crucial element of the Thyssen historical myth that the two sides always pretended to have nothing to do with one another, a myth that the first three books in this series are nonetheless still trying to propagate.

Upon closer inspection of the contents lists, however, curious internal restructurings of files appear to be going on in these two archives. There are important files, which we know used to be in the archives of ThyssenKrupp, such as, surprisingly, the estate of Wilhelm Roelen (main war-time manager of Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza) or, unsurprisingly, the estate of Robert Ellscheid (main lawyer of Fritz and Amélie Thyssen), and which are now said to be in the new Thyssen Industrial History Foundation archives.

But what is most noticeable from the footnotes is that time and time again, when reference is made to armaments in particular, the files in question tend to allegedly have been sourced in the archives of the newly created Thyssen Industrial History Foundation, rather than the archives of ThyssenKrupp AG, giving the impression of a possible damage limitation aspect in respect of this already ailing giant of German heavy industry.

In any case, one of the few major admissions made in this book is that Fritz Thyssen’s flight from Germany to Switzerland at the onset of World War Two might have had less to do with heroic opposition to Adolf Hitler and more with the fact that he had contravened foreign exchange regulations and committed tax evasion on a massive scale, as we first revealed (though they say nothing of the other reasons for his flight, including Hitler’s humiliating accusations of self-interest).

While presenting the actual figures of Fritz Thyssen’s misdemeanours, namely 31 million Reichsmark in evaded tax plus 17 million Reichsmark Reich Flight Tax, equalling a total of 48 million RM payable to the German State, Dr Donges quickly attenuates the claim by explaining that the denazification board of 1948 did not come to the conclusion that this had played a role in Fritz Thyssen’s flight. But what he fails to mention – although another author in the same series of books does – is how any genuine Aufarbeitung by these courts stalled once the Cold War began.

It is also noticeable that the author alleges the critical tax investigation into Fritz Thyssen’s affairs to have begun in the late 1920s, when in actual fact it had started almost immediately after the end of World War One.

The book manages to reveal that the retiring Joseph Thyssen branch of the dynasty (deriving from the brother of old August Thyssen) indirectly profited from the persecution of the Jews, as the Reich paid out their 54 million RM shares in VSt after Fritz Thyssen’s flight and the confiscation of his assets, by handing them shares previously owned by Jews and taken from them as part of the Jewish Assets Levy (Judenvermögensabgabe).

But it was Fritz Thyssen, whose anti-semitism was most overt, as he was prominently involved in forcing the Jewish members Paul Silverberg, Jakob Goldschmidt, Kurt Martin Hirschland, Henry Nathan, Georg Solmssen and Ottmar E Strauss to vacate their seats on the supervisory board of VSt in 1933/4. And no matter how often in this series they will try to tell us that Fritz Thyssen “gradually denazified himself” starting in 1934 and that his anti-Semitism was not of the vicious, murderous kind, we need to remember that forcing Jews out of their jobs was the first step in their disenfranchisement and on the road to the Holocaust.

When the Simon Hirschland Bank in Essen was „aryanised“ in 1938 by a banking consortium including Deutsche Bank and Essener National-Bank AG, Fritz Thyssen bought a share of 0.5 million RM, yet his role is said to be „unclear“ and „explained unsatisfactorily by reseachers“, which is the academics’ way of sowing doubt over established facts, especially when these are detrimental to the Thyssens’ image, and especially when they have been funded by Thyssen institutions to rewrite their history.

Of course generally the all important finance and banking side of things remains as much in the dark as it was at the time in question. Dr Donges mentions anonymous holdings in Holland, Switzerland and the USA; the Reich’s camouflaging of armaments financing through Metallurgische Forschungsanstalt; and Faminta AG of Glarus, Switzerland, which he alleges to have been a foreign vessel for Thyssen & Co. rather than for Fritz Thyssen personally. He leaves US bond creditors unnamed and states that „the role of the Finance Ministry within the Third Reich has not been sufficiently studied yet“.

And while on page 28 Dr Donges admits, albeit in the most superficial of ways, that after the death of the patriarch August Thyssen in 1926, Fritz Thyssen had to relinquish “part of the VSt shares” to his brother Heinrich, he does not tell us how long this stock [not just a few shares, but an initial 55 million RM, no less, and for which Fritz received shares in the family’s Dutch bank Bank voor Handel en Scheepvaart in Rotterdam in return, which was controlled by Heinrich] might have remained under Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza’s ownership and whether any of it was still in his possession at the time of the confiscation of Fritz’s fortune in 1939/40 (and if so, what happened to it after this date).

Instead the author concentrates on looking at the „use of political, legal and social options to further economic success….during the Nazi period“. He concludes that „entrepreneurial advantages were to be gained from the development of the armaments enterprises“ and that „although the freedom of action was hampered through many restrictions compared to the time of the Weimar Republic, the leadership of VSt could still pursue a long-term investment strategy.“

Thus this work ends with the earth-shattering conclusion that „if one looks at the development lines of the German steel industry in the 20th century, the long-term trend was that the steel manufacturers moved towards further processing. So VSt in the 1930s would probably have chosen that way even under another political regime“.

So presumably that was the main purpose of this book; to save the image of ThyssenKrupp AG and the conscience of surviving members of the Thyssen family, who have profited, and continue to do so, from the part Vereinigte Stahlwerke AG played in the death of 80 million people as a result of World War Two.

It is very difficult to see how Dr Donges’s doctoral thesis could possibly “close the gap” in research on the subject of the history of the United Steelworks during the Nazi period, as has been the claim made at the outset of this series “Family – Enterprise – Public. Thyssen in the 20th century”.

But whether anyone outside his immediate circle of overtly Thyssen-financed researchers will now wake up from their “great unquestioning slumber” and decide to pursue a more forthcoming research on the subject remains to be seen. Academic book reviews so far (by Tobias Birken at Sehepunkte and by Tim Schanetzky at H-Soz-Kult) suggest that they will not. In any case, how dissident academics would be received when knocking on the doors of “Professor Rasch’s archives”, remains an altogether different question.

Political economist (Dr.) Alexander Donges, gaining his title by being a Thyssen academic mercenary at Mannheim University

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in The Thyssen Art Macabre, Thyssen Corporate, Thyssen Family No Comments »

Ein Umschreiben der Geschichte – Thyssen im 20. Jahrhundert: Immer noch voller Rechtfertigungen und Beschönigungen, mit einer erheblichen Anzahl von offensichtlichen Auslassungen – aber doch auch einigen, manchmal erstaunlichen Eingeständnissen.

Es hat sieben Jahre seit der Veröffentlichung unseres Buches über die Thyssens im Asso Verlag Oberhausen gebraucht, bis die erste Tranche der „offiziellen“ Thyssen Antwort heraus gekommen ist, in der Form der ersten einer Reihe von acht Büchern, die von der Fritz Thyssen Stiftung und der neuen Stiftung zur Industriegeschichte Thyssen finanziert, und vom böswilligen Professor Manfred Rasch, Leiter des ThyssenKrupp Konzernarchivs, orchestriert werden; dessen Voreingenommenheit sich in der Tatsache manifestiert, dass auf unser Buch zwar oft Bezug genommen, es aber nie zitiert wird.

Prof. Rasch schafft es sogar, unsere Existenz zu verleugnen, indem er behauptet, der verstorbene Baron Heini Thyssen-Bornemisza sei zeitlebens mit seinem Vorhaben gescheitert, eine authorisierte Biografie in Auftrag zu geben.

Nach einigen Verzögerungen sind 2014/5 die ersten drei Bücher der Serie erschienen: „Die Vereinigte Stahlwerke AG im Nationalsozialismus“; „Zwangsarbeit bei Thyssen“ und „Die Thyssens als Kunstsammler“. Wir werden alle drei in den kommenden Wochen rezensieren.

Erstaunlicherweise sind die Autoren der Bücher alle jüngere Akademiker, ohne bzw. mit geringer bisheriger Kenntnis oder praktischer Erfahrung des jeweiligen Themas, und die als „unabhängige Historiker“ beschrieben werden. Es heisst, sie würden „eine Forschungslücke“ in der Geschichte der Thyssen Familie, der ThyssenKrupp AG und der Thyssen-Bornemisza Gruppe „schließen“.

Da diese Autoren jedoch von eben diesen Personen, Unternehmen und assoziierten Stiftungen beauftragt, gesponsort und unterstützt worden sind ist es nicht zutreffend, sie als „unabhängig“ zu beschreiben. Solch eine Aussage ist vielmehr im besten Falle irreführend und im schlimmsten Falle betrügerisch.

Im Falle des herausragenden Investors in diese Arbeiten, die in weiten Teilen nichts anderes als akademische Hagiografien zu sein scheinen, sollte man sich daran erinnern, dass die Fritz Thyssen Stiftung von Amélie Thyssen gegründet wurde, die der NSDAP bereits 1931 – also zwei Jahre vor ihrem Mann Fritz Thyssen – beigetreten war, und die niemals öffentlich bereut oder ihr Bedauern für ihre Unterstützung Adolf Hitler’s zum Ausdruck gebracht hat.

Man muss sich auch fragen, warum nicht erfahrenere Akademiker mit erwiesenem Wissen und Fähigkeiten für dieses wichtige und heikle Program gewonnen werden konnten. Es ist anzunehmen, dass dies entweder darauf basiert, dass die Junioren „formbarer“ sind oder darauf, dass die höher gestellten Wissenschaftler nicht bereit waren, ihren eigenen Ruf zu gefährden, um die trübe Geschichte der Thyssens aufzupolieren.

Hierbei ist für die beaufsichtigenden Projektleiter Prof. Margit Szöllösi-Janze (Universität München) und Prof. Günther Schulz (Universität Bonn) die Übergangslinie hin zur akademischen Hurerei wohl schon sehr verschwommen, da generell in den letzten 55 Jahren so viele akademische Forschungsprojekte in Deutschland von eben dieser Fritz Thyssen Stiftung finanziert worden sind. Es dürfte äusserst schwierig sein, sich von dieser ewiglich betriebsbereiten Stipendien-Pumpe zu emanzipieren.

Demgegenüber beschuldigte uns Manfred Rasch während unseres Besuchs im Archiv der ThyssenKrupp AG 1998 nicht nur, das Empfehlungsschreiben von Heini Thyssen gefälscht zu haben, er war auch extrem unkooperativ und behauptete, mit der Geschichte der Thyssen Familie, von der er in negativen Tönen sprach, nichts zu tun zu haben. „Sein“ Archiv enthalte kein Material über die Thyssen Familie, sagte er. Die Frage lautet also: Was hat sich verändert, dass er nunmehr ein Mitwirkender bei diesem Projekt ist?

Wir nehmen an, es war unsere Publikation “Die Thyssen-Dynastie. Die Wahrheit hinter dem Mythos” und die ungünstige Berichterstattung in der Frankfurter Allgemeinen Zeitung, da dies der Zeitpunkt zu sein scheint, an dem das akademische Programm der Schadensbegrenzung von ihm, der Familie und dem Unternehmen in Gang gesetzt wurde.

Guido Knopp, die graue Eminenz der deutschen TV-Geschichts-Dokumentation, hat in einem seiner Programme gesagt, „unsere Generation ist nicht verantwortlich, für das, was unter den Nazis geschehen ist, aber sie ist umso verantwortlicher für das Erinnern daran, was passiert ist.“

Im Licht der Thyssen Geschichte wirft dies die Frage auf: wie sollen wir die Geschichte der Nazi-Ära angemessen recherchieren und daran erinnern, wenn Menschen wie die Thyssens 70 Jahre lang auf den Beweismaterialien sitzen und sie nur einigen Personen unter privilegierten, akademischen Kriterien zur Verfügung stellen und sie so der Wahrnehmung durch die allgemeine Öffentlichkeit entziehen?

Das Resultat solch einer undurchsichtigen Aufarbeitung kann nur eine Beschönigung sein und diese Serie, genauso wie etliche Bücher die in der Vergangenheit von der Thyssen Organisation unterstützt wurden, enthält davon ganz offensichtlich sehr viel. Und wenn nicht in Fakten, dann in Mutmaßungen.

Doch soweit es ersichtlich ist werden in diesen Büchern auch einige wichtige Eingeständnisse gemacht, vermutlich damit ein Mindestmaß an Glaubwürdigkeit eingehalten werden kann, oder vielleicht auf Druck der am meisten voraus denkenden Mitglieder des Teams. Diese Tatsache bestätigt für uns den Wert der Zeit und Anstrengung, die wir darin gesteckt haben, das erste ehrliche Portrait überhaupt der Thyssen Familie und ihrer Aktivitäten zu zeichnen.

Es freut uns, dass wir damit den angestrebten Effekt erzielt haben, nämlich die Organisation dazu zu bewegen, von der alten Version der Geschichte abzurücken, welche sich weigerte überhaupt etwas zuzugeben, das negativ ausgelegt werden konnte und die Thyssens immer nur im Licht eines selbstlosen Heldentums und makellosen Stolzes darstellte, die sich besonders in einer angeblichen Abwendung von den Idealen der Nazis äusserten.

Ein 94 Jahre alter, ehemaliger Auschwitz-Buchhalter, Oskar Gröning, der selbst nie an Tötungen beteiligt war, wurde vor Kurzem zu vier Jahren Haft verurteilt. Er zeigte große Reue und entschuldigte sich für seine Mitwirkung am Massenmord, eine Haltung, die nicht von vielen seiner Mitbeschuldigten gezeigt worden ist, falls überhaupt jemals in dieser Form.

Es fühlte sich an wie eine Äußerung, die abgestimmt war, um ein neues Bild von Aufarbeitung zu präsentieren, eine offenere, ehrlichere Aufarbeitung, die auch mit den Opfern mitfühlend ist. Oder vielleicht ist Herr Gröning nur ein besonders erleuchteter Mensch.

Außer Herrn Gröning’s Äußerung kommentierte der Staatsanwalt dann noch folgendermaßen: Auschwitz hätte nicht nur mit einzelnen Straftaten zu tun gehabt, sondern sei ein „System“ gewesen, und „jeder der zu diesem System beigetragen“ habe, sei „verantwortlich“.

Die Thyssens haben in vielfältiger Weise und sehr viel mehr als viele andere zum Nazi System beigetragen, zum Beispiel indem sie halfen, Hitler’s Truppen so massiv zu bewaffnen, dass in weiten Teilen Europas das Nazi-Terrorregime eingerichtet werden konnte. Ihre Nachfahren, die von den unmoralischen Gewinnen ihrer Ahnen (und Ahninen) profitiert haben, und dies noch tun, haben sehr viel mehr Grund als die allgemeine deutsche Öffentlichkeit heute, sich zu entschuldigen und sicherlich daran zu erinnern, was genau geschah.

Die Frage ist: werden sie je eine ähnliche Äußerung abgeben, wie dies Oskar Gröning getan hat?

Und noch wichtiger: falls nicht, warum nicht?

"Wer die Musik bezahlt bestimmt die Melodie". Amelie Thyssen, die ewige Sponsorin (copyright Fritz Thyssen Stiftung)

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in The Thyssen Art Macabre, Thyssen Art, Thyssen Corporate, Thyssen Family No Comments »

Rewriting History – Thyssen in the 20th century: Still an overall exercise in vindication or whitewash, with a good number of obvious omissions – but admittedly featuring the occasional, important and sometimes puzzling admission.

It has taken seven years since the publication of our crucial book about the Thyssens (in the Asso Verlag publishing company of Oberhausen/Ruhr) for the first instalment of the „official“ Thyssen response to appear, in the form of the first in a series of eight books, co-financed by the Fritz Thyssen Foundation and the newly formed Thyssen Industrial History Foundation; orchestrated by the malevolent Prof. Manfred Rasch, chief archivist of ThyssenKrupp AG, whose prejudice is manifest in the fact that while our book is often referred to, it is never credited.

Prof. Rasch even manages to deny our existence by claiming that the late Baron Heini Thyssen-Bornemisza failed in his ambition to commission an authorised biography.

In 2014/5, following numerous delays, three volumes of the series have appeared: “The United Steelworks under National Socialism”, “Forced Labour at Thyssen” and “The Thyssens as Art Collectors“. We will review all three over the coming weeks.

The authors of the books are all, somewhat surprisingly, junior academics with no or limited previous knowledge or practical experience of their subjects and described as „independent historians“, who are said to be „closing the gaps“ in research concerning the history of the Thyssen Family, ThyssenKrupp AG and the Thyssen-Bornemisza Group.

However, as the authors were commissioned, funded and assisted in their research by the same people, commercial organisations and related foundations, there can be no way in which they could be accurately described as „independent“ and such a claim is at best misleading and at worst fraudulent.

In the case of the major investor, in what often appears to be little more than an academic hagiography, it should be remembered that the Fritz Thyssen Stiftung was started by Amélie Thyssen, who had joined the Nazi party in 1931 – two years before her husband Fritz Thyssen – and who never publicly recanted or displayed any regret for her support of Adolf Hitler.

One also wonders why senior academics of proven knowledge and ability were not won over to deal with this important and sensitive program. One has to assume that it was either because the juniors were more „malleable“ or because more senior academics were not prepared to risk damaging their own reputations while polishing the Thyssens’ tarnished history.

Of course for the project’s supervising professors Margit Szöllösi-Janze (Munich University) and Günther Schulz (Bonn University) the lines of academic whoring must be extremely blurred, as so many general academic research projects in Germany in the past 55 years have been funded by this same Fritz Thyssen Foundation. It must be incredibly difficult to emancipate oneself from this ever primed sponsorship pump.

By contrast, when we visited the archives of ThyssenKrupp AG in 1998, not only did Manfred Rasch accuse us of forging our letter of introduction from Heini Thyssen, but he was also offensively un-cooperative and purported to have nothing to do with the history of the Thyssen family, who he spoke of derisively and said that „his“ archive contained no material that related to them. So the question is: what has changed for him to now be a contributor to such a project?

Presumably, it was the publication of „The Thyssen Art Macabre“ and the resulting adverse publicity in the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, as this appears to be the point in time when his, the family’s and the corporations’ academic program of damage limitation was conceived.

Guido Knopp, the éminence grise of German historiography, has said in one of his popular television programs that „our generation is not responsible for what happened under the Nazis, but we are responsible for keeping the memory alive of what happened“.

In light of the Thyssen story, this begs the question: how are we supposed to adequately research and remember the history of the Nazi period if people like the Thyssens sit on evidence for 70 years and reveal it only to a selected few under privileged, academic criteria, thus keeping it very much outside the perception of the general public?

The result of such an opaque approach to Aufarbeitung can only be an exercise in vindication and in this series, as with so many books supported in the past by the Thyssen organisation, there is plenty of that. And if not in fact, then in conjecture.

But as far as we can see there are also now important admissions being made, presumably in order to retain a modicum of credibility, or perhaps at the insistence of the more forward thinking members of the team. This fact vindicates the time and effort we expended in producing the first honest portrayal of the Thyssen family and its activities.

We are delighted that our book has had the intended effect, namely to force the organisation to depart from the old official version of events which refused to admit anything that could be considered negative and only ever represented the Thyssens in a light of selfless heroism and untarnished pride, particularly manifest in a claimed rejection of Nazi ideals.

Recently a 94-year-old German former Auschwitz camp administrator, Oskar Gröning, who had not been directly involved in the killings, was sentenced to four years in prison. He showed deep remorse and apologised for his involvement, not something often displayed by his co-accused, if ever.

It felt like a concerted effort to present an image of Aufarbeitung which is a new, more open and honest way, and one that is explicitly sympathetic with the victims. Or maybe Mr Gröning is just a very enlightened individual.

In addition to Gröning’s statement, the public prosecutor commented that far from being just about individual crimes, Auschwitz was very much about „a system“, and that „whoever contributed to that system was responsible“.

The Thyssens contributed in many ways and much more than many others to the Nazi system, for instance by helping to arm Hitler’s troops to the point where the Nazi terror regime could be implemented over much of Europe. Their descendants, who have profited and continue to do so, from their forefathers’ (and mothers’) ill-gotten gains, have far more reasons than the German general public today to apologise and certainly to remember.

The question is: will they ever make a comparable statement to the one Oskar Gröning has made?

And more importantly: if not, why not?

"He who pays the piper calls the tune". The eternal sponsor, Amelie Thyssen (copyright Fritz Thyssen Foundation)

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in The Thyssen Art Macabre, Thyssen Art, Thyssen Corporate, Thyssen Family No Comments »

Lorne Thyssen – Buying Scholarship or: ‘does money smell’?

While both ThyssenKrupp and the Thyssen Bornemisza Group continue to pay academics and charitable foundations to rewrite their past, one member of the family has additionally been funding scholarship in order to buy an exalted academic identity for himself; with wealth polluted by the same tarnished history.

Lorne Thyssen-Bornemisza was born in Switzerland to the Scottish fashion model Fiona Campbell-Walter, who by the time of his birth was already separated from Lorne’s legal father, the Hungarian, Dutch, Swiss, German, Catholic, industrialist and art collector, Baron Hans Heinrich (Heini) Thyssen-Bornemisza; a man with his own identity problems, for whom Fiona had been his third wife.

As his second son, Lorne was also encouraged to adopt the ‘theatrical’ Austro-Hungarian title of ‘Baron’, despite the fact that in Switzerland (where waiters refer to him as ‘Mr Baron’), Austria and Hungary, the title has no legal status and Heini claimed his adopted son’s biological father was actually the American, Jewish, TV producer Sheldon Reynolds. But that didn’t stop Heini from accepting Lorne as a legal heir and supplying him with a dangerously generous allowance.

Lorne was educated at Le Rosey, a cosmopolitan, Swiss school that is perhaps better known for the wealth of its students’ parents than their off-springs’ academic achievement and from where he was expelled prior to completion of his International Baccalaureate studies. However, he did subsequently complete his basic Swiss Military Service while displaying less enthusiasm for gainful employment at the Thyssen Bornemisza Group´s corporate headquarters in Monaco.

Having adopted English as his first language, Lorne then established his colourful and extravagant social presence in London before endeavouring to read politics and philosophy at Edinburgh University. But as a result of the social distractions afforded him by his generous allowance, he failed to devote sufficient time to his studies and was obliged to abandon his academic ambitions.

He then moved to New York where he attended acting classes and even achieved some small measure of success in an off-Broadway Shakespeare play before moving on to Paris and from there to Beirut; where he acted in, and directed, a multi-million dollar, Thyssen-Bornemisza funded movie. He also adopted Muslim faith and became involved in Islamic mysticism, via the Sufi movement; whose funds he contributed to.

His generosity and the size of his inherited fortune were doubtless also instrumental in his being awarded a seat on the board of the Muslim Cogito Scholarship Foundation.

By now it must have begun to occur to Lorne that he could ‘procure’ academic status without the time-consuming inconvenience of having to study or take exams.

Heini had also taught him that cultural status could be obtained by the simple expedient of loaning out parts of his inherited art collection. A policy that would save on the cost of art storage and insurance.

So it was that he chose to loan his inherited collection of Muslim carpets to the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin; which resulted in a considerable enhancement of his standing amongst Germany’s cultural elite.

Considering the amount of time and effort that the Thyssen-Bornemiszas had invested in avoiding being considered German and denying their historic connections with the country, particularly during World War II, Berlin was, despite being the recognised centre of oriental carpet dealing, an extremely strange choice of location. Presumably it was an attempt to enhance his profile in Germany while his adopted family history was coming under academic scrutiny.

But given that Lorne wanted to achieve academic status in the UK, his choice of Oxford was logical, entirely predictable and possibly offered tax advantages to both parties. Given the Thyssens’ history of support for the Reich, use of industrial slave labour, involvement in violent anti-Semitism, profits from arms manufacturing in two World Wars, avoidance of reparations and retrieval of German assets by means of manipulated nationality and use of covert international banking, Lorne’s acceptance as an Honorary Fellow by the Wolfson College, Oxford University, in return for setting up the ‘Lorne Thyssen Research Fund for Ancient World Topics’, was nauseating; particularly as the College was originally founded and funded by Isaac Wolfson, a devout orthodox Jew and committed Zionist.

This was certainly not the first time that the Thyssens had used philanthropy to enhance their academic status while hiding the less palatable details of their past, which doubtless led to great aunt Amelie Thyssen’s creation of the Fritz Thyssen Foundation and aunt Gaby (Gabrielle Bentinck nee Thyssen-Bornemisza) giving money to Tel Aviv University via Lord George Weidenfeld, who developed a masterly skill in brokering such philanthropic deals. This process may also have encouraged Yad Vashem (Israel’s Holocaust Commemoration, Documentation, Research and Education Centre) to overlook the Thyssens´ involvement in the slaughter of one hundred and eighty Jewish slave workers as after dinner entertainment at their castle in Rechnitz, Burgenland, Austria, on 24./25.03.1945. For one of the unfortunate by-products of academic philanthropy is that in protecting their benefactors, seats of learning are often encouraged to participate in historical amnesia.

Subsequently, Lorne’s freshly-minted academic status may have awarded his recently opened Kallos Gallery in London’s Mayfair some additional degree of credibility in its sale of his ancient Greek artefacts; if only he had resisted having the temerity to announce that he had signed up to ‘read’ Classical Studies with the Open University (having first presented the OU with ‘two fully funded MA scholarships…made possible through the generosity of Baron Lorne Thyssen-Bornemisza. The scholarships will provide the full fees for two year part-time MA studentships in Classical Studies at the Open University’) presumably in an attempt to acquire some small measure of legitimate, academic achievement.

Though I doubt that professional image builders would have encouraged such a revelation, as it could only serve to demote his elevated status as a ‘Fellow’ and ‘Honorary Fellow’ elsewhere.

I admire the Open University and used to respect Oxford University as what I believe I should expect it to be; an incorruptible seat of learning. But I don’t admire or respect academic whoring. There is too much of it about and, in this case, it is in clear contradiction of the old Latin adage, ‘Pecunia non olet.’

https://www.wolfson.ox.ac.uk/person-type/honorary

https://www.wolfson.ox.ac.uk/clusters/ancient-world/lorne-thyssen-research-fund

http://www.open.ac.uk/Arts/classical-studies/baron-thyssen-ma-scholarship.shtml

(p.s.: Lorne Thyssen is also a Fellow of The Royal Numismatic Society. At its 2012 International Congress held at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem he acted as a chairperson with presentations given by members of Staatliche Museen Berlin, Tel Aviv University and Oxford University – thus closing the circle of – what we have the right to consider – duplicity).

Lorne Thyssen-Bornemisza pretending to be British and clean (www.thyssenpetroleum.com).

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in The Thyssen Art Macabre, Thyssen Art, Thyssen Corporate, Thyssen Family No Comments »