Thyssen Art

                                                                                                 

                              The Empress of Hubris

                                                 (photo copyright: Deck Hand Ryan Lombard, Courtesy TBA21-Academy)

                                                                                                  

Tags: , , ,
Posted in The Thyssen Art Macabre, Thyssen Art, Thyssen Corporate, Thyssen Family No Comments »

The Thyssen Art of Tax Avoidance . . . and Philanthropic Feudalism

During our research for ‘The Thyssen Art Macabre’, we became witnesses to the art of what is now being called ‘aggressive’ tax avoidance, as a result of our participation in a lengthy masterclass with one of the world’s leading exponents. It was Heini Thyssen himself who admitted to us that his primary mission in life had not been the collecting of art or the maintenance of an industrial fortune, but the avoidance of paying tax. Indeed on page 319 of our book we quoted his astonishingly frank statement word for word: ‘I am a tax evader by profession. If you wanted to be correct, I should be in jail’.

The most intensive part of this masterclass came when Heini chose to take his son Heini Junior (Georg Thyssen) to court, in order to break up a Bermudan trust and regain control of the family fortune. This was not only a structure that had been designed to make such disassembly as difficult as possible and thus protect the fortune from alimony claims, irresponsible siblings and, in Heini’s case, his own extravagance, but it was also meant to minimise its exposure to tax liabilities.

I was astonished that, considering the financial importance of this process to the Thyssen-Bornemiszas, the cost of which, one way or another, they would all be contributing to, not one member of the family displayed any interest in visiting the island, to see if their legal and financial representatives were handling the task with due diligence; a process that would eventually result in a legal bill of some $150,000,000. So I offered to go on their behalf, in the knowledge that the very rich rarely do anything for themselves, even collect art; preferring to have others do things on their behalf.

It was in Bermuda that Caroline and I got to know Heini’s barristers, Queen’s Counsellors Michael Crystal and Robert Ham and their local solicitors, Appleby Spurling & Kempe; experts in tax efficient, financial logistics – and in whose gardens we would complete each day’s activities with refreshing bottles of chilled champagne. Then, more recently, I was reminded once again of their existence when a vast cache of their highly privileged clients’ records were mysteriously leaked to the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists from the offices of what had now been rebranded as simply Appleby. This resulted in a spectacular media exposure which has come to be known as the ‘Paradise Papers’.

Around the same time that this financial pasta was beginning to slide off the edge of the plate, the less financially privileged were starting to realise just how iniquitous the super rich really can be. There is increasingly a perceived imbalance reminiscent of feudal conditions, which seem to be favoured not least by those whose marriage has led them to co-opt scions of defunct aristocratic dynasties. The highly paid advisors, meanwhile, had started putting strategies into place in order to meet the PR-challenges of the forced increase in transparency now being applied to offshore financial instruments and their wealthy users.

With this backdrop, Heini Thyssen’s daughter, ’The Archduchess’ Francesca von Habsburg, whose name featured prominently in the ‘Paradise Papers’, wasted no time in announcing to the world her own seemingly admirable ‘mission statement’. This was to use part of her estimated $350,000,000 personal fortune, – inherited from her father, some of which was provided by the Spanish tax payers, when he sold them half his art collection – to save the world’s oceans from pollution.

She also began referring to herself as an ‘executive producer’ and ‘agent of change’.

Soon her London-based organisation TBA21-Academy was said to be ‘curating a top level conference at the Bonn Art Museum’ (a publicly funded organisation!) at the 23rd session of the Conference of the Parties (COP23) to the United Nations Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). But in truth this was but a one-day coming together of some of the privileged recipients of her ‘altruism’.

In order to assist her in such an intellectually complex activity, she had recruited the services of a major Broadway-based public relations organisation called Resnicow and Associates, which specialises in ‘online strategy’, ‘core missions’ and ‘sponsorship“; though considering her exceptional wealth one would not have thought that Francesca Habsburg-Thyssen needed the latter. But I know from my own experience that she has invariably asked others to contribute financially to her various socio-cultural activities over the years. And this has also included those in control of public funds.

Meanwhile, I noticed that she still had her British Virgin Islands-based Fragonard art sub-trust in place, into which her inherited Thyssen-Bornemisza art collection share had been placed in 1993 and which was said to have engendered a presumably Cayman Islands-based trust with the assistance of Appleby Trust Cayman Limited in 2008. Then there is the Alligator Head Foundation Jamaica. She also continues to enjoy the amenities of Thyssen Bornemisza Group (TBG) AG Zurich, TBG Holdings Limited Bermuda, Favorita Investment Limited Malta and other such tax-efficient facilities.

The apple seemed not to have fallen far from the tree and her father’s influence possibly continued to affect Francesca Thyssen’s exposure – or not, as the case may be – to tax in Austria, Switzerland, the Czech Republic, the United Kingdom, Jamaica or anywhere else she may see fit to lay her head.

And it looks as if even a supra-national entity such as the United Nations may be ‘endorsing’ her enterprise in philanthropic feudalism, which would be viewed with a distinct lack of sympathy by polemicists, such as myself and my collaborator. Indeed the latter told me: ‘Aggressively avoiding the payment of tax can hardly be considered helpful to governmental agencies who are responsible for the protection of the environment. Using tax payers’ money to fund one’s own, indulgent self-promotion is even less so’.

But presumably Resnicow is intending to garner sufficient public enthusiasm for Francesca Habsburg’s cultural endeavours in the months ahead to successfully persuade those who care, that should she indeed be aggressively minimising her exposure to the payment of tax, she will nevertheless be perceived as a true philanthropist, acting only in the public’s cultural and environmental interests.

And Resnicow will surely be able to help with disaster management advice, if German academia and the media is ever obliged to accept the truth of our account of where Francesca Thyssen’s fortune comes from. Or if she is held accountable for fulfilling her promise of assisting in locating the graves of one hundred and eighty Jewish slave labourers put to death by the SS ‘guests’ of her Aunt Margit Batthyany-Thyssen in the grounds of the family’s Rechnitz castle in 1945.

Meanwhile, one should perhaps be reminded that the last time there was a Thyssen financial interest on Broadway was during the Second World War, when it was the location of the Thyssen family’s Union Banking Corporation in which they and, so it was rumoured, a number of prominent Nazi party members kept a few million emergency dollars, and Prescott Bush, grandfather of George W Bush, was a director!

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in The Thyssen Art Macabre, Thyssen Art, Thyssen Corporate, Thyssen Family No Comments »

Göring & Thyssen – Partners in crime

Hermann GöringFriend, banking client and protector of the Thyssen family and corporate fortune, seen here with Baron Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza in relaxed, equestrian circumstances in 1936 (photo copyright strictly Süddeutsche Zeitung Photo / Alamy Stock Photo)

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in The Thyssen Art Macabre, Thyssen Art, Thyssen Corporate, Thyssen Family No Comments »

Posted in The Thyssen Art Macabre, Thyssen Art, Thyssen Corporate, Thyssen Family No Comments »

Thyssen Provenienz à la Terlau oder Die Kunst der Akademischen Unfähigkeit

Nach Ablauf von 10 Monaten seit der Veröffentlichung von Johannes Gramlich’s Buch über „Die Thyssens als Kunstsammler“ ist nunmehr die erste offizielle Rezension erschienen – verfasst von Dr Katja Terlau, einer deutschen Kunsthistorikerin, die sich auf Provenienzforschung spezialisiert – und zwar online auf der Rezensionsplatform Sehepunkte sowie in der Kunstzeitschrift Kunstform.

Das Schockierendste an diesem Beitrag ist, dass die Rezensentin es bei drei unterschiedlichen Gelegenheiten versäumt, die klare Unterscheidung zwischen den Sammlungen Fritz Thyssen und Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza (sowie später Hans Heinrich) zu formulieren, und diese statt dessen wie eine einzige Sammlung behandelt. Man kann nur hoffen, dass Dr Terlau in ihrer Provenienzforschungsarbeit sorgfältiger vorgeht und muss sich nebenbei auch über den Standard von „Sehepunkte“ und „Kunstform“ wundern, die solch eine fehlerhafte Rezension veröffentlichen!

Generell handelt es sich um eine begeisterte Einschätzung eines Buches, das ein „unabhängiger Historiker“ geschrieben haben soll, der „durch die Fritz Thyssen Stiftung und die Stiftung zur Industriegeschichte Thyssen gefördert“ wurde. Genauso „unabhängig“, so nimmt man an, wie Katja Terlau selbst, die 2001, gefördert durch eben diese Fritz Thyssen Stiftung in Köln, ein Kolloquium unter dem Titel „Museen im Zwielicht – Ankaufspolitik 1933-1945“ im Wallraf-Richartz-Museum in Köln organisiert hat.

In einer überschwänglichen Art, ähnlich der von Johannes Gramlich selbst, beschreibt Dr Terlau die Thyssens als „namhaft“, „erfolgreich“, „einflussreich“ und „hervorragend vernetzt“, und dass sie dank ihrer „Leidenschaft“, „Kunstliebe“ und ihres „besonderen Gespürs“ eine „prachtvolle“, „herausragende“ und „hochwertige“ Sammlung erwarben (nicht weil Letzteres stimmt – es stimmt nicht – sondern weil die Thyssens schwer-reich und große Sponsoren der akademischen Welt sind, wodurch manche Menschen extrem geblendet und leichtgläubig werden).

Dr Terlau’s Fähigkeiten der kritischen Analyse erreichen einen Tiefpunkt, wenn sie von der „insgesamt prägenden Zeit für die gesamte Sammlungsentwicklung“ schwärmt, als Heinrich Thyssen „allein“ zwischen 1926 und 1936 „rund 50 Millionen Reichsmark“ ausgab, um „über 500 Gemälde“ zu kaufen. Die Erklärungen in Gramlich’s Buch, dass Heinrich’s Nachfolger Hans Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza in den 1960er und 1970er Jahren mindestens 125 dieser besagten Bilder wieder stillschweigend abgestoßen hat, lässt sie dabei unerwähnt. Und auch dass viele Experten zur Zeit der ersten Ausstellung von Heinrich’s Sammlung 1930 in München dieser so kritisch gegenüberstanden, dass teilweise bis zu 400 der Gemälde als qualitativ fragwürdig eingeschätzt wurden.

Aber es gibt hier auch einige Lichtblicke, z.B. kritisiert Dr Terlau richtigerweise die Tatsache, dass die Kunstobjekte „häufig nur mit Künstlernamen….und selten mit dem Titel angegeben (sind), sodass eine eindeutige Identifizierung der Werke meist nicht möglich ist“. Sie wirft Gramlich auch vor, „verschiedene Bestandslisten der Kunstwerke“ zu erwähnen, „ohne sie jedoch wenigstens in Auszügen zu zitieren“. Auch verwende er ihrer Einschätzung nach „auch ältere und sehr allgemeine Literatur (…), die dem aktuellen Forschungsstand nicht mehr gerecht wird“!

Dr Terlau kritisiert ebenfalls Gramlich’s „Bewertung des Materials, etwa bei den Marmorskulpturen Rodins oder gar von Keramikkunst“, die „aus kunsthistorischer Sicht (…) sehr fragwürdig“ sei, obwohl unklar ist, was dies genau heissen soll. Eine Erklärung bleibt aus. Sie bemängelt, Gramlich habe bei seiner Bewertung des Kunsthandels „den Handlungsgegenstand (nicht) konkreter berücksichtigt“. Es gehe hier immerhin um „Sammlungsobjekte, deren Handel von zahlreichen Faktoren und Persönlichkeiten abhängt und daher sehr schwer fassbar ist“ – wobei Dr Terlau den Leser wiederum im Dunkeln lässt, was genau sie damit aussagen will.

Ihre Aussage jedoch, Gramlich’s Einschätzung „Die nationalsozialistische Inbesitznahme der Kunst ist vergleichbar mit dem wachsenden Kunstinteresse des Bürgertums im 19. Jahrhundert“ „mutet (…) sehr befremdlich an“, ist von uns absolut nachvollziehbar, ist es uns doch beim Lesen der Passage in Gramlich’s Buch ebenso ergangen.

Es ist nur schade, dass Dr Terlau es versäumt, auch auf andere „befremdliche“ Elemente in Gramlich’s Buch hinzuweisen, wie z.B. der Tatsache, dass die Thyssens von der Zerschlagung jüdischer Sammlungen profitierten und dass sie Kunst für ihre persönliche Selbstverherrlichung und Steuervermeidung ausnutzten. Von der unmoralischen Teilquelle des Vermögens, welches für ihre Kunstkäufe verwendet wurde, ganz zu schweigen (Waffenproduktion, Zwangsarbeit).

Alles in allem empfiehlt Dr Terlau Johannes Gramlich’s Buch als „hervorragend“ und als „breite Grundlage für viele weitere Forschungsansätze“. Was jedoch das Thema Thyssen angeht, so dürfte dies wohl nicht in der Entscheidungskraft der akademischen Welt liegen, sondern vielmehr in der der „einflussreichen“, „hervorragend vernetzten“ Thyssens und ihrer Organisationen, mit ihrer Kontrolle über entscheidende Quellen und ihrer finanziellen Macht.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in The Thyssen Art Macabre, Thyssen Art, Thyssen Corporate, Thyssen Family No Comments »

Thyssen Provenance à la Terlau or The Art of Academic Ineptitude

With a delay of 10 months following the publication of Johannes Gramlich’s book on „The Thyssens As Art Collectors“, the first official review, written by Dr Katja Terlau, a German art historian specialising in provenance research, has now finally appeared on the Sehepunkte review platform, as well as in the art magazine Kunstform.

What is most shocking about this piece is that the reviewer on three separate counts fails to appreciate the fact that the collections of Fritz Thyssen and of Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza (and later Hans Heinrich) were two completely separate collections, describing them instead as one collection. One can only hope that Dr Terlau operates with more care in her general provenance research work, while one is also left wondering about the standards of „Sehepunkte“ and „Kunstform“ for publishing such a misleading assessment!

In general terms, this is a glowing review of a book said to be written by an „independent historian“, „supported by the Fritz Thyssen Foundation and the Thyssen Industrial History Foundation“. That is, one presumes, as independent as Katja Terlau herself, who in 2001, with the support of the same Fritz Thyssen Foundation of Cologne, organised a colloquium entitled „Museums in the Twilight Zone – Purchase policies 1933-1945“, at the Wallraf-Richartz-Museum in Cologne.

Dr Terlau describes, in a gushing manner very akin to that of Johannes Gramlich himself, the Thyssens as a „renowned“, „successful“, „influential“, and „preeminently cross-linked“ family, who acquired a „magnificent“, „outstanding“, „high quality“ collection through the „passion“, „love“ and „special feeling“ of its members (not because the latter is true – it’s not -, but because the Thyssens are super-rich and major academic sponsors, which tends to leave people supremely dazzled and gullible).

Dr Terlau’s faculties of critical analysis sink to the lowest possible level when she enthuses how Heinrich Thyssen paid „ca. 50 million Reichsmark“ between 1926 and 1936 „alone“ to buy „over 500 paintings“. Meanwhile, she leaves the explanations by Gramlich that Heinrich’s heir Hans Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza quietly disposed of at least 125 of those paintings, in the 1960s and 1970s, unmentioned. Or the fact that many experts at the time of Heinrich’s first exhibition in Munich in 1930 were highly critical of his collection, estimating anything up to 400 paintings to be of questionable quality.

There are a few redeeming features too, for instance when Dr Terlau quite rightly criticises the fact that so few of the actual art works are described by Gramlich sufficiently precisely to make an accurate identification of the works possible at all. She also accuses him of mentioning art inventories without ever citing from them, and of using sources that are well out of date and totally behind the current level of research!

Dr Terlau goes on to criticise Gramlich’s evaluation of the Thyssens’ Rodin marble sculptures and ceramic art in particular as „very questionable“, although it remains unclear what exactly she means by this. No explanation is forthcoming. She also objects to him failing to „take into account the object of the art trade in a more concrete manner“, while stating „this trade depends on many factors and personalities and is very difficult to grasp“ – again leaving the reader at a loss to understand what exactly is the point she is trying to make.

However, her statement that Gramlich’s assessment „the Nazis’ appropriation of art can be compared to the growing interest in art of the bourgeoisie in the 19th century“ „seems very disconcerting“ is a description that chimes very much with the feeling experienced by ourselves when we first read the passage in Gramlich’s book.

It is a shame that Dr Terlau has not seen fit to include in her review more of the „very disconcerting“ elements of Gramlich’s book, such as the Thyssens taking advantage of the disbanding of Jewish collections or their abuse of art for personal aggrandisement as well as tax avoidance, to name but a few. On top of which comes, of course, the morally questionable partial source of the wealth used for the art purchases (arms manufacture, forced labour).

On the whole, Dr Terlau recommends Johannes Gramlich’s book as „distinguished“ and as forming „a broad basis for many further research approaches“. However, as far as Thyssen is concerned, it can be assumed that it is not academia, but the „influential“ and „preeminently cross-linked“ Thyssens and their organisations, with their essential control over relevant source material and their financial power, who will be deciding on that.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in The Thyssen Art Macabre, Thyssen Art, Thyssen Corporate, Thyssen Family No Comments »

Gibt es wirklich eine neue Thyssen Bescheidenheit am Horizont?

Es ist fast ein Jahrzehnt her, seitdem unser kontroverses Buch mit 500 Seiten über Thyssen erschien („Die Thyssen-Dynastie. Die Wahrheit hinter dem Mythos“), welches eine umfangreiche offizielle Antwort in Gang setzte, deren Logik manchmal schwer zu verstehen ist; es sei denn als Beteuerung der akademischen Glaubwürdigkeit der Fritz Thyssen Stiftung oder zur Beschwichtigung der Schuld der Thyssen Familie.

For zwei Jahren begann die Fritz Thyssen Stiftung, mit Zustimmung ihres Kuratorium-Mitglieds Georg Thyssen-Bornemisza und der Unterstützung des ThyssenKrupp AG Konzern Archivs, endlich mit der Freigabe einer Serie von zehn Büchern (mit insgesamt mindestens 5,000 Seiten!) unter dem Titel „Familie – Unternehmen – Öffentlichkeit. Thyssen im 20. Jahrhundert“. Bisher sind drei Bücher erschienen (zwei davon waren Doktorarbeiten) und von uns rezensiert worden: Donges über die Vereinigten Stahlwerke, Urban über Zwangsarbeit und Gramlich über Kunst.

Dann wurde im November 2015, ausserhalb der chronologischen Abfolge, Band 5, „Thyssen in der Adenauerzeit. Konzernbildung und Familienkapitalismus“ herausgegeben. Der Status des Autors, Professor Johannes Bähr, sein bisheriges Werk und seine angebliche Verpflichtung zur Transparenz in der zeitgeschichtlichen Auftragsforschung hatten Hoffnungen auf eine wirklich kritische Analyse der Art und Weise aufkommen lassen, wie diese Familie, die eine der größten Kriegsgewinnler und Unterstützer Hitlers war, nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg in Deutschland ihre Macht zurück gewinnen konnte.

Leider spiegelt die fast Disney-artige und doch hochmütige Oberflächlichkeit des Buches wieder einmal die Stempelmarke eines vom Unternehmen authorisierten Werks allzu offensichtlich wider. Wir werden daher unsere Rezension bis zum Ende der Serie verschieben, nicht zuletzt da ca. 2017 (?) ein weiterer Band erscheinen soll, der sich mit der „Konfiszierung“ von Fritz Thyssens Vermögen während und dessen Rückerstattung nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg auseinander setzt. Ohne diesen lässt sich Band 5 nicht wirklich rezensieren, angenommen es interessiert sich bis dahin überhaupt noch irgend jemand dafür.

Die weiteren Bände der Serie, die noch ausstehen sind auf der einen Seite Simone Derix, „Die Thyssens. Familie und Vermögen“ und Felix de Taillez, „Fritz und Heinrich Thyssen. Zwei Bürgerleben für die Öffentlichkeit“ (beide angekündigt für Juni 2016), wobei letzteres allein schon im Titel eine unglaubliche Kehrtwende signalisiert für eine Organisation, die es bisher ausließ, eine seriöse Darstellung von Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza zuzulassen, der dunkelsten Persönlichkeit in der Familie, der die engsten Verbindungen – nicht zuletzt durch Bankenaktivitäten – mit dem verbrecherischen Nazi-Regime hatte.

Und schlussendlich handelt es sich noch um vier Werke, deren Erscheinungsdatum bisher unklar ist, nämlich: Jan Schleusener über die „Konfiszierung“ und Rückerstattung von Fritz Thyssens Vermögen; Harald Wixforth über die Thyssen Bornemisza Gruppe 1919-1932; Boris Gehlen über die Thyssen Bornemisza Gruppe 1932-1947; und Hans Günter Hockerts über die Geschichte der Fritz Thyssen Stiftung.

Fast parallel dazu hat sich ThyssenKrupp (oder thyssenkrupp, wie es sich jetzt mit seinem neuen, filigranen Logo nennt) unter Heinrich Hiesinger einer großen Kampagne des Imagewechsels unterworfen. Hiesinger kämpft seit seiner Übernahme als Vorstand 2011 an mehreren Fronten gegen riesige Verluste aus früherem Mismanagement und Korruptionsskandalen, sowie den Folgen des rapiden Verfalls der europäischen Stahlindustrie.

Hiesinger’s Programm aus Rationalisierung und Transparenz ist von Martin Wocher im Handelsblatt als “neue Bescheidenheit der Ruhrbarone“ beschrieben worden (von denen es natürlich eigentlich schon lang gar keine mehr gab) und von Bernd Ziesemer in Capital als einen „verordneten Kultur- und Mentalitätswandel“, der es thyssenkrupp ermöglicht, aus der „Tradition der Korruption in der Stahlbranche“ auszuscheren.

Aber wie glaubwürdig und erfolgreich kann solch ein Kampf um das Aufpolieren des angeschlagenen Images von thyssenkrupp vor dem Hintergrund einer anhaltenden Intransparenz der Geschichtsschreibung des Unternehmens wirklich sein?

Fast als wollte sie die Widersprüchlichkeiten der Situation illustrieren ließ sich diesen Monat Francesca Habsburg, geborene Thyssen-Bornemisza, Enkelin von Heinrich, im Deutschen Fernsehen (“ZDF Hallo Deutschland Mondän: Wien”) als „schwer-reiche Thyssen-Erbin“ darstellen, „die kein Blatt vor den Mund zu nehmen braucht“. Als solche attackierte sie den österreichischen Staat als “heuchlerisch”, weil er den Namen Habsburg für den Tourismus ausnutze, sich jedoch weigere, ihre Kunstausstellungsaktivitäten mit Steuergeldern zu finanzieren. Dann setzte sie den Namen ihres Mannes herunter (und zwar durchwegs auf Englisch, nicht auf Deutsch!):

„Der Name Habsburg hat mich nicht beeindruckt. Ich war von ihm nicht überwältigt. Was mich beeindruckt hat, war mein Schwiegervater, und wie er die Familie zusammen gehalten hat. Ich glaube, die Familie hat erkannt, dass ich die Geschichte der Familie akzeptiert habe und dass sie durch mich eine komfortable [offensichtlich meinte sie finanziell komfortable] Zukunft hat“. (alle Zitate ungefähr aus der Erinnerung).

Aber natürlich ist es nicht die Geschichte der Habsburger, die Schwierigkeiten bereitet. Es ist die Geschichte ihrer eigenen, der Thyssen Familie und ihrer industriellen und Bankgeschäftsaktivitäten, aus denen sich ihr Vermögen herleitet, mit der sich Francesca Thyssen aus Demut tatsächlich einmal befassen sollte.

Thyssen ohne Stahl. Ein Symbol schwindender Unternehmensidentität.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in The Thyssen Art Macabre, Thyssen Art, Thyssen Corporate, Thyssen Family No Comments »

Is there really a new Thyssen humility on the horizon?

Nearly a decade has passed since the publication of our controversial, 500-page book on Thyssen („The Thyssen Art Macabre“), following which a large official response was set in motion, the logic for which is sometimes difficult to understand, except perhaps to reaffirm the academic credibility of the Fritz Thyssen Foundation and assuage the Thyssen family’s guilt.

Two years ago, the Fritz Thyssen Foundation, with the consent of its board member Georg Thyssen-Bornemisza and the support of the ThyssenKrupp company archives, finally started releasing a series of ten books (anything around 5000 pages in total!) entitled „Family – Enterprises – Public. Thyssen in the 20th Century“. So far, three books have appeared (two of which were doctoral thesis) and were reviewed by us: Donges on the United Steelworks, Urban on Forced Labour and Gramlich on Art.

Then, in November 2015, somewhat at odds with the chronology, volume five, „Thyssen in the Adenauer Period. Concern Formation and Family Capitalism“ by Professor Johannes Bähr was issued. The author’s status, track record and purported commitment to transparency in company-commissioned research gave rise to hopes for a genuine, critical analysis of the regaining of power, after World War Two, in Germany, of a family who had been major war profiteers and Hitler supporters.

Unfortunately, the book’s almost Disney-style, yet haughty superficiality once again displayed all too obviously the hallmarks of a Thyssen-authorised work. We will thus be postponing our review until the end of the series, not least because another tome, out sometime around 2017 (?), is set to deal with the „confiscation“ of Fritz Thyssen’s assets during, and their restitution after World War Two, a topic without which volume 5 cannot really be fully appreciated, assuming that anybody out there will have the stamina to actually get that far.

The remaining books of the series to be published are on the one hand: Simone Derix, „The Thyssens. Family and Fortune“ and Felix de Taillez, „Fritz and Heinrich Thyssen. Two Bourgeois Lives for the Public“ (both due out in June 2016), whereby the latter title represents an unbelievable turn-around for an organisation which in the past has denied any serious representation of Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza, the darkest character of the family, who had the closest bonds – not least through banking – with the evil Nazi regime.

And finally, four books, whose publication dates remain so far undisclosed: Jan Schleusener on the „confiscation“ and restitution of Fritz Thyssen’s fortune; Harald Wixforth on the Thyssen-Bornemisza Group 1919-1932; Boris Gehlen on the Thyssen-Bornemisza Group 1932-1947; and Hans Günter Hockerts on the history of the Fritz Thyssen Foundation.

Almost in parallel, ThyssenKrupp (or thyssenkrupp as it is now known, with its new, filigree logo) has seen a major image change campaign taking hold under Heinrich Hiesinger who, since taking over as chief executive in 2011, has been fighting on several fronts against huge deficits from past mismanagement and corruption scandals, as well as the rapid decline of the European steel-making sector.

Hiesinger’s programme of streamlining and transparency has been described by Martin Wocher in Handelsblatt as „the end of the era of the self-aggrandising Ruhr barons“ (of which, of course, there have not really been any left for quite some time) and by Bernd Ziesemer in Capital as a „change in culture and mentality“ that is allowing thyssenkrupp to distance itself from the „tradition of corruption“ within the steel industry.

But how believable and successful can this fight for the polishing of thyssenkrupp’s tarnished image really be against a background of persistent opacity in the company’s historiography?

As if to illustrate the contradictions involved in the situation, Francesca Habsburg, nee Thyssen-Bornemisza, grand-daughter of Heinrich, this month on German TV’s „ZDF Hallo Deutschland Mondän: Wien“ feature, having let herself be described as a „super-rich Thyssen heiress“, who „has no need to mince her words“, used the programme to attack the Austrian state as „hypocritical“ for using the Habsburg name to help tourism while refusing to fund her art exhibition activities with tax payers’ money. She then denigrated her husband’s name by stating (in English rather than German throughout!):

„The name Habsburg did not dazzle me. I was not overwhelmed by it. I was overwhelmed by my father-in-law, and how he kept the family together. I think the family has come to understand that I have accepted the history of the family and that it has a comfortable [clearly meaning financially comfortable] future through me“. (all quotes approximate from memory).

Of course, it is not the Habsburg family history that is difficult to accept. It is the history of her own, the Thyssen family and their industrial and banking endeavours from which her fortune came, that Francesca Thyssen should, in fact, start being sufficiently humble to concern herself with.

Thyssen without steel. A symbol of their fast disappearing corporate identity.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in The Thyssen Art Macabre, Thyssen Art, Thyssen Corporate, Thyssen Family No Comments »

Buchrezension: Thyssen im 20. Jahrhundert – Band 3: “Die Thyssens als Kunstsammler. Investition und symbolisches Kapital (1900-1970)”, von Johannes Gramlich, erschienen im Schöningh Verlag, 2015.

 

Nach all den Ausweichmanövern um die Geschäftemacherei mit dem Tod und dem Elend anderer Menschen schauen wir jetzt auf die „glitzernde“ Seite der Medaille, nämlich die sogenannten Kunstbemühungen der Thyssen Familie. Diese hatten mehr mir Kapitalflucht, der Umgehung von Devisenkontrollen und Steuervermeidung (Kunstsammlungen werden von Gramlich als „probates, da schwer zu kontrollierendes Mittel, um Steuerforderungen zu mindern“ beschrieben), kurzfristiger Spekulation, Kapitalschutz und Profitmaximierung, als mit einer ernsthaften Beschäftigung mit oder gar Erschaffung von Kunst zu tun.

Bezeichnenderweise ist bisher keine einzige Rezension dieses dritten Bands in der Serie „Thyssen im 20. Jahrhundert: Die Thyssens als Kunstsammler“ ermittelbar, welcher wiederum nichts anderes darstellt, als die verkürzte Form (mit fast 400 Seiten!) einer Doktorarbeit, diesmal an der Universität von München. Nicht eine einzige Erwähnung irgendwo, dass dieser Student der Geschichte, Germanistik und Musik vielleicht nicht genau weiss, wovon er schreibt, da er keine vorherige Kenntnis der Kunstgeschichte zu haben scheint oder irgendein ersichtliches persönliches Talent für die bildenden Künste. Oder darüber, dass viel zu viel von der Kunst, die die Thyssens erwarben, Plunder war. Oder dass die Thyssens behaupteten, Ungarn zu sein, wenn sie etwas von Ungarn wollten, Schweizer wenn sie etwas von der Schweiz wollten, und Niederländer wenn sie etwas von den Niederlanden wollten.

Prinzipiell scheint die hauptsächliche Aussage dieses Buches folgende zu sein: lang anhaltend zu täuschen ist die höchste Leistung überhaupt, und so lange einer reich und mächtig und unmoralisch genug ist, um sein ganzes Leben lang zu täuschen, dann wird es ihm gut ergehen. Nicht zuletzt deshalb, weil er genug Geld in einem Legat hinterlassen kann, damit an seinem Ruf weiterpoliert werden und eine anhaltende Mythologisierung auch nach seinem Ableben vonstatten gehen kann. Und falls die Person noch das zusätzliche Glück hat, auf ihrem Weg vom Unglück anderer zu profitieren, um so besser – so wie es in diesem Buch von Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza im Falle der jüdischen Sammlungen von Herbert Gutmann und Max Alsberg beschrieben wird und von Fritz Thyssen im Falle derer von Julius Kien und Maximilian von Goldschmidt-Rothschild.

Aber: findet irgend jemand diese Aussage akzeptabel?!

Seltsamerweise enthält dieses Buch auch einige sehr negative Bewertungen des wahren Charakters einiger Thyssens. Fritz Thyssen wird (in einem Zitat von Christian Nebenhay) als „wenig imponierend“ und „nichtssagend“ beschrieben. Von seinem Bruder Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza wird gesagt, er sei „sehr schwierig“, „unangenehm“, „geizig“ gewesen, habe „vereinbarte Zahlungsmodalitäten (…) nicht immer einhalten (wollen)“ und habe „offensichtlich wenig Verständnis für die Bedürfnisse und Wünsche von Menschen aufbringen (können), die sich in einem Abhängigkeitsverhältnis zu ihm befanden“. Von Amelie Thyssen wird gesagt, sie habe sich „um eine autorisierte Biographie über ihren Ehemann (bemüht). Die Vorgänge um Thyssens Abkehr vom Nationalsozialismus sollten darin eine größere Rolle spielen, für die eine Verzerrung der Überlieferung in Kauf genommen worden wäre“. Auch habe sie über den genauen Zeitpunkt von Kunstkäufen die Unwahrheit gesagt, um Steuern zu sparen.

Zum Glück kannten wir keine Thyssens aus dieser zweiten Generation. Dafür kannten wir aber Heini Thyssen, den letzten direkten männlichen Nachfahren August Thyssen’s, und das sehr gut. Über ca. 25 Jahre hinweg (Litchfield länger als Schmitz) hatten wir das Glück, alles in allem viele Monate in seiner Gesellschaft zu verbringen. Wir mochten und vermissen ihn beide sehr. Er war ein großartiger Mann mit einem wunderbaren Sinn für Humor und einer sprühenden Intelligenz. Das Erstaunlichste an ihm, angesichts des allgemeinen Überlegenheitsgefühls der Familie, war, dass er selbst überhaupt nicht arrogant war.

Heini Thyssen beschrieb uns gegenüber den Kunsthandel als „das schmutzigste Geschäft der Welt“. Er wusste genauestens Bescheid über die Geheimniskrämereien der Händler, die Hyperbeln der Auktionshäuser und die Unaufrichtigkeiten der Experten. Es war eine rauhe See, die er mit der richtigen Kombination von Vorsicht und Wagemut navigierte, um erfolgreich zu sein. Aber er nutzte natürlich den Kunsthandel auch gnadenlos aus, um sich ein neues Image zu verleihen. Im Gegensatz zu seinem Vater und Onkel, war er damit so unglaublich erfolgreich, eben weil er so ein sympathischer Mensch war.

Aber Heini Thyssen war deshalb noch lange kein tugendhafter Mensch. Er täuschte weiterhin über seine Nationalität, den Ursprung und die Größe seines Vermögens, seine Verantwortung und seine Ergebenheit, genauso wie sein Vater, sein Onkel, seine Tante (und bis zu einem gewissen Grad auch sein Großvater) es getan hatten. Und jetzt fährt diese akademische Serie damit fort, die selben alten Mythen zu verbreiten, die immer schon, seit der Gründung des modernen deutschen Nationalstaats, nötig waren, um die Spuren dieser Räuberbarone zu verwischen. Die Größe und der angebliche Wert der Thyssen-Bornemisza Sammlung brachten auch viele aus dem Kunstbetrieb und der allgemeinen Öffentlichkeit dazu, sein Verhalten zu akzeptieren.

Von der überaus wichtigen Thyssen-eigenen, niederländischen Bank voor Handel en Scheepvaart, z.B., wird immer und immer wieder behauptet, sie sei 1918 gegründet worden, obwohl das wirkliche Datum mit höchster Wahrscheinlichkeit 1910 war. Dies ist wichtig, denn die Bank war das wichtigste offshore-Instrument, welches die Thyssens nutzten, um ihre deutschen Vermögenswerte zu tarnen und ihren Konzern, sowie ihr Privatvermögen, nach dem ersten verlorenen Krieg vor einer allierten Übernahme zu schützen. Aber diese Information ist heikel, denn sie bedeutet gleichzeitig eine massive Untreue der Thyssens Deutschland gegenüber, dem Land das die einzige ursprüngliche Quelle ihres Reichtums ist, war, und immer sein wird.

Und auch hier wird wieder von Heinrich und Heini Thyssen behauptet, sie seien ungarische Staatsangehörige gewesen, vermutlich weil dies entschuldigen soll, dass sie trotz ihrer massiven Unterstützung der Kriegsmaschinerie der Nazis, die einige der verheerendsten Verbrechen in der Geschichte der Menschheit ermöglichte, auch nach dem zweiten verlorenen Krieg der alliierten Vergeltung entgingen. In Wirklichkeit war Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemiszas ungarische Nationalität höchst fragwürdig, aus folgenden Gründen: weil er sie ursprünglich „gekauft“ hatte, weil sie nicht durch regelmäßige Besuche in dem Land, das er wieder verlassen hatte, aufrecht erhalten wurde, weil Verlängerungen durch gesponsorte Freunde und Verwandte arrangiert wurden, die in diplomatischen Einrichtungen arbeiteten und weil Heinrich seine deutsche Nationalität aufrecht erhielt. Im Falle von Heini Thyssen war dessen Status vollständig davon abhängig, dass sein Stiefvater in der ungarischen Botschaft in Bern arbeitete und ihm die nötigen Ausweispapiere besorgte (eine von uns als Ersten etablierte Tatsache, die nun aber von der „Nachwuchsgruppenleiterin“ Simone Derix in ihrem Buch über das Vermögen und die Identität der Thyssens so dargestellt wird, als sei es ihre eigene “akademische” Erkenntnis; die entsprechende Habilitationsschrift (!) ist bereits intern verfügbar. Seltsamerweise wird ihr Buch, obwohl es Band 4 in der Serie ist, erst nach Band 5 erscheinen). Diese ungarischen Nationalitäten als legitim zu bezeichnen ist absolut falsch. Und es ist ein sehr wichtiger Punkt.

Als Philip Hendy von der Nationalgalerie in London 1961 eine Ausstellung mit Bildern aus Heini Thyssens Sammlung organisierte, sagte ihm Heini anscheinend, er könne unmöglich im selben Jahr ausstellen wie Emil Bührle und fügte hinzu: „Wissen Sie, Bührle was ein echter deutscher ‘Rüstungsmagnat’, der später Schweizer wurde, es wäre also für mich sehr schlecht, (…) mit deutschen Waffen in Verbindung gebracht zu werden (…)“. Aber der Grund für seine Sorgen war nicht, wie es dieses Buch zu vermitteln scheint, dass Heini Thyssen nichts mit deutschen Waffen zu tun hatte, sondern eben gerade dass er damit zu tun hatte! Da diese anteilige Quelle des Thyssen-Vermögens nun von Alexander Donges und Thomas Urban bereits zugegeben wurde, ist es höchst fragwürdig, dass Johannes Gramlich in seiner Arbeit nicht auf diese Tatsache hinweist.

Dann wiederum gibt es in diesem Werk neue Zugeständnisse, wie z.B. die Tatsache, dass August Thyssen und Auguste Rodin keine enge Freundschaft hatten, wie es in den bisherigen wichtigen Büchern verbreitet wurde, sondern dass ihre Beziehung vielmehr – wegen Streitereien um Geld, einer Nützlichkeitspolitik der Öffentlichkeit gegenüber und künstlerischem Unverständnis – schlecht war. Das einzige Problem mit diesen Erläuterungen ist, dass wiederum wir die Ersten waren, die diese Realität erkannt und beschrieben haben. Nun jedoch begeht dieses Buch einen schamlosen Plagiarismus an unseren Forschungsanstrengungen und, indem vorgegeben wird, wir gehörten nicht zum „akademischen“ Kreis, werden die „akademischen Meriten“ dafür, die Ersten zu sein, dies zu veröffentlichen, von den Plagiierenden sich selbst zugeschrieben.

Eine weitere unserer Enthüllungen, welche in diesem Buch bestätigt wird, ist dass die Ausstellung der Sammlung von Heinrich Thysssen-Bornemisza in München im Jahr 1930 ein Desaster war, weil so viele der gezeigten Werke als Täuschungen bloßgestellt wurden. Luitpold Dussler im Bayerischen Kurier und in der Zeitschrift „Kunstwart“; Wilhelm Pinder in der Kunstwissenschaftlichen Gesellschaft München; Rudolf Berliner; Leo Planiscig; Armand Lowengard von Duveen Brothers und Hans Tietze gaben alle negative Kommentare über die Sammlung des Barons ab: „teures Hobby“, „eindeutig falsche Zuschreibungen“, „mehr als 100 Fälschungen, verfälschte Bilder und unmögliche Künstlernamen“, „Thyssen-Bornemisza könne die Hälfte der Ausstellungsobjekte wegwerfen“, „400 Bilder, von denen Sie keines heutzutage kaufen sollten“, „rückwärtsgewandtes Sammlungsprogramm“, „abstoßende Benennungen“, „irreführend“, „Atelierabfälle“, etc. etc. etc. Der Baron konterte, indem er insbesondere die rechts-gerichtete (!) Presse dazu antreiben ließ, positive Artikel über seine sogenannten kunstsinnigen Bestrebungen, sein patriotisches Handeln und seine philanthropische Großzügigkeit zu veröffentlichen, eine Einstellung dem Allgemeinwohl gegenüber, die allerdings nicht auf Tatsachen beruhte, sondern einzig und allein auf Thyssen-finanzierter Öffentlichkeitsarbeit.

Das Buch befasst sich fast überhaupt nicht mit den Kunstaktivitäten von Heini Thyssen, was verwunderlich ist, da er doch bei weitem der wichtigste Sammler in dieser Dynastie war. Statt dessen wird eine Menge Information weiter gegeben, die absolut nichts mit Kunst zu tun hat, wie z.B. die Tatsache, dass Fritz Thyssen das Gut Schloss Puchhof kaufte und es von Willi Grünberg verwalten ließ. In Gramlichs Worten: „Laut eines nachträglichen Gutachtens war die Bewirtschaftung des Guts unter Fritz Thyssen auf hohe Bareinnahmen ohne Rücksicht auf Substanzerhaltung oder -verbesserung angelegt, was zu einem Niedergang der Verwertbarkeit von Grund und Boden in der Zeit danach geführt habe. Nach dem Urteil des Spruchkammerverfahrens waren die Raubbau-Methoden allerdings vor allem auf Grünberg selbst zurückzuführen, der damit Tantiemen zu generieren trachtete.“ Anscheinend habe Grünberg auch während des Kriegs auf Gut Puchhof über 100 Kriegsgefangene malträtiert, aber nach einer kurzen Zeit der Untersuchung nach dem Krieg wurde er auf Geheiss von Fritz Thyssen wieder in seiner Position bestätigt. Dies gibt einen guten Eindruck davon, wie untauglich die Denazifizierungsprozedere waren, aber auch wie Thyssens Einstellung zu Menschenrechten und zur Ungültigkeit allgemeiner Gesetze für Menschen seines Standes war.

Man fragt sich auch, wieso betont wird, Fritz Thyssen habe die größte Länderei in Bayern 1938, für überteuerte 2 Millionen RM, speziell für seine Tochter Anita Zichy-Thyssen und den Schwiegersohn Gabor Zichy gekauft, obwohl uns Heini Thyssen und seine Cousine Barbara Stengel ganz eindrücklich erklärten, die Zichy-Thyssens seien mit Hermann Görings Hilfe, für den Anita als Privatsekretärin gearbeitet hatte, 1938 nach Argentinien ausgewandert, und zwar an Bord eines Schiffes der deutschen Marine. Nachdem der alte Mythos wieder aufgekocht wird, wonach Anitas Familie bei ihren Eltern war, als diese am Vorabend des Zweiten Weltkriegs aus Deutschland flohen, macht das Buch nun die zusätzliche „Enthüllung“, Anita und ihre Familie seien im Februar 1940 in Argentinien angekommen. Dies ohne jedoch zu erklären, wo die Personen in der Zwischenzeit gewesen sein sollen, während Fritz und Amelie Thyssen von der Gestapo nach Deutschland zurück gebracht wurden. Dabei ist “Februar 1940” genau das Datum, an dem Fritz und Amelie, von denen Anita später erben würde, ihre deutsche Staatsangehörigkeit aberkannt wurde, eine Tatsache, die später sehr wichtig dafür war, dass es ihnen möglich sein sollte, ihre deutschen Vermögenswerte zurück zu erlangen.

Die defensive Haltung dieses Buches zeigt sich auch daran, dass von Eduard von der Heydt, einem weiteren Nazi Bankier, Kriegsprofiteur und Kunstinvestment-Berater der Thyssens gesagt wird, „abseits aller Proteste und Unmutsregungen (…), blieb eine positiv konnotierte Verwurzelung und Präsenz in der Region (Ruhr), die bis heute unübersehbar ist“. Dies muss unter anderem darauf Bezug nehmen – spricht dies aber aus irgend einem Grund nicht an – dass einige Deutsche, denen die Rolle von der Heydts als Nazi Bankier aufstößt, dafür gesorgt haben, dass der Name des Wuppertal-Elberfelder Kulturpreises, wo sich auch das von der Heydt Museum befindet, von „Eduard von der Heydt Preis“ auf „Von der Heydt Preis“ abgeändert wurde. Es scheint hier aber so zu sein, dass ein Willi Grünberg als Fußsoldat die schlechteren Karten bekommt, während dem reichen Kosmopolit Eduard von der Heydt eine Art diplomatische Immunität zuerkannt wird. Ebenso wie in Buch 2 dieser Serie (über Zwangsarbeit) Meister und Manager an den Pranger gestellt werden, während man die Thyssens weitestgehend frei spricht. Es bleibt eine verzerrende Art, die Geschichte des Nationalsozialismus aufzuarbeiten, die so nicht mehr geschehen dürfte.

Während dessen ist es aber Johannes Gramlich erlaubt, zu berichten, dass Fritz Thyssen in Anbetracht in seinen Augen revolutionärer Umtriebe, 1931 seine Sammlung in die Schweiz überführen ließ, um sie im Sommer 1933 wieder nach Deutschland zurück bringen zu lassen – als ob es überhaupt ein noch stärkeres Anzeichen dafür geben könnte, wie sehr ihn die Machterlangung Adolf Hitlers zufrieden stellte.

Während der gleichen Periode köderte Heinrich, nach der katastrophalen Ausstellung 1930 in München, das Museum in Düsseldorf mit einem unverbindlichen In-Aussicht-Stellen einer Leihgabe seiner Sammlung. Es wird auch gesagt, er habe den Bau eines „August Thyssen Hauses“ in Düsseldorf geplant, in dem er seine Sammlung permanent unterbringen wollte. In Anbetracht der Tatsache, jedoch, das Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza nun wirklich Zeit seines Lebens und selbst für die Zeit danach noch alles unternommen hat, um niemals als Deutscher betrachtet zu werden, ist es seltsam, dass Johannes Gramlich dieses Vorhaben nicht genauer einordnet, z.B. als offensichtlich vorgetäuschter Plan oder andererseits als Beweis, dass Heinrichs aller tiefstes Zugehörigkeitsgefühl eben doch teutonisch geprägt war. Wegen der schlechten Qualität von Heinrichs Kunstkäufen gab es zwar eigentlich gar nicht wirklich eine Sammlung, die man im Museum in Düsseldorf hätte ausstellen können, aber dies hinderte dessen Direktor Dr Karl Koetschau nicht daran, sich über Jahre hinweg für sie zu engagieren. Er war enttäuscht vom Verhalten des Barons, ihn so lange hinzuhalten und die Episode bewegt sogar Johannes Gramlich dazu, negativ zu kommentieren: „Ohne Dank und Gegenleistung, die (der Baron) erst auf ausdrückliche Bitte erbrachte, nahm er trotzdem sämtliche Annehmlichkeiten in Anspruch“.

Gramlich schreibt, die Sammlung Schloss Rohoncz sei „ab 1934“ in Lugano untergebracht worden, unterlässt es aber immer noch, die genauen Zeitabläufe und logistischen Verfahren zu beschreiben, die zur Überführung von 500 Bildern in die Schweiz beigetragen haben sollen. Es ist eine Unterlassung für die es keinerlei Entschuldigung geben kann. Man sollte auch bedenken, dass 1934 das Jahr war, in dem die Schweiz ihr Bankgeheimnis verankerte, was wohl der ausschlaggebende Grund dafür gewesen sein dürfte, dass Heinrich Lugano als endgültigen Sitz seiner „Kunstsammlung“ wählte.

Die vielen, unangenehmen Auslassungen in diesem Buch sind aufschlussreich, v.a. wenn von Heini Thyssen gesagt wird, er habe eine Büste von sich anfertigen lassen, die der Künstler Nison Tregor ausführte. Dass er jedoch auch eine von Arno Breker, Hitlers bevorzugtem Bildhauer anfertigen ließ, wird nicht erwähnt. Die Aussparungen werden allerdings absolut inakzeptabel, wenn zwar vom Rennstall Erlenhof geschrieben wird, dessen „Arisierung“ (1933, von Oppenheimer zu Thyssen-Bornemisza) jedoch nicht erwähnt wird. Und ganz extrem abstoßend im Falle von Heinrichs Tochter Margit Batthyany-Thyssen, deren Beteiligung, zusammen mit ihren SS-Liebhabern, an der Greueltat an 180 jüdischen Zwangsarbeitern im März 1945 am SS-requirierten, aber Thyssen-finanzierten Schloss Rechnitz, unerwähnt bleibt. Beide Fälle werden weiterhin totgeschwiegen, was an die Art der Holocaustleugnungen eines David Irving erinnert.

Auch ist erstaunlich, dass der Autor ein starkes Bedürfnis zu haben scheint, die Frage der Finanzierung von Heinrich Thyssen’s Sammlung zu mystifizieren, obwohl Heini Thyssen uns sehr klar erklärte, dass sein Vater dies über einen Kredit tat, den er bei seiner eigenen Bank voor Handel en Scheepvaart aufnahm. Es ist ein ganz einfaches Prinzip, aber Johannes Gramlich erklärt es so umständlich, dass man denken muss, er täte dies, um es so aussehen zu lassen, als habe Thyssen Geld in einem goldenen Topf ähnlich dem heiligen Gral gehabt, der nichts mit den Thyssen Unternehmungen zu tun hatte und statt dessen beweist, dass Heinrich tatsächlich von einer alten, aristokratischen Linie entstammte, so wie er es sich wünschte (und in seinem Kopf der festen Überzeugung war, dass es der Realität entsprach!).

Es wird auch die gleichsam unwahrscheinliche Behauptung aufgestellt, alle Details jedes einzelnen der Tausende von Thyssens erstandenen Kunstwerke seien durch „das Team“ in eine riesige Datenbank eingeben worden, die ein raffiniertes Netzwerk von Informationen und Querverweisen enthält. Und dennoch werden in diesem Buch nur eine Handvoll von Bildinhalten tatsächlich erwähnt oder beschrieben. Der Leser fragt sich also immer wieder, wieso für ein Thema, das so eine große Bedeutung im Leben der Thyssens hatte, so ein unerleuchteter Mann beauftragt wurde, und nicht ein erfahrener Kunsthistoriker. Ist es deshalb, weil es einfacher ist, solch einen Mann Aussagen tätigen zu lassen wie z.B.: „Persönliche Unterlagen wurden bei der Beschlagnahme von Fritz Thyssens Vermögen durch die Nationalsozialisten im Oktober 1939 vernichtet, geschäftliche Dokumente fielen vor allem den Bomben des Zweiten Weltkriegs zum Opfer“, weil die Organisation die wahren Details des Lebens von Fritz und Amelie Thyssen während des Kriegs nicht preisgeben will? (ein kleiner Tipp: die bösen Nazis sperrten sie in Konzentrationslager und warfen die Schlüssel weg ist definitiv nicht das, was geschah). Oder weil er bereit ist, zu schreiben: „Der auf Kunst bezogene Schriftverkehr von Hans Heinrich (…) ist ab 1960 systematisch überliefert“ und „Wer federführend für die Bewegungen in den Sammlungsbeständen der 1950er Jahre verantwortlich war, ist mangels Quellen nicht sicher zu sagen“, da es sonst schwierig zu erklären wäre, wie ein Mann, dessen Besitz bis 1955 enteignet gewesen sein soll, davor teure Kunst kaufen und damit handeln konnte?

Wurde Dr Gramlich beauftragt weil ein Mann mit so wenig Erfahrung, von „APC“ als einem „amerikanischen Unternehmen“ schreiben kann, mit dem Heini Thyssens Firma Verhandlungen geführt habe, da er nicht weiss, dass sich hinter dem Kürzel der „Alien Property Custodian“ (also der Treuhänder für ausländisches Eigentum) verbirgt? Oder weil er immer und immer wieder die unglaubliche Qualität der Thyssen Sammlungen anpreist, obwohl klar zu werden scheint, dass viele der Bilder, inklusive Heinrich’s „Vermeer“ und „Dürer“ und Fritz’s „Rembrandt“ und „Fragonard“ gefälscht waren? Die Lost Art Koordinierungssstelle in Magdeburg beschreibt diesen Fragonard übrigens als seit Juni 1945 aus Marburg verschollen, aber Gramlich sagt, das Bild sei bis 1965 in der Sammlung Fritz Thyssen in München gewesen und erst seitdem, nachdem es “nur noch mit 3,000 DM (bewertet wurde) da (… seine) Originalität für fragwürdig (erachtet wurde)”, verschollen.

An einer Stelle schreibt Gramlich über zwei Bilder von Albrecht Dürer in der Sammlung Thyssen-Bornemisza, ohne jedoch ihre Titel zu verraten. Er beschreibt, dass das eine von Heini Thyssen 1948 verkauft wurde. Es ging an den Amerikanischen Sammler Samuel H Kress und schließlich an die Nationalgalerie in Washington. Was Gramlich nicht sagt, ist dass dies „Madonna mit Kind“ war. Das andere Bild ist in der Sammlung Thyssen-Bornemisza verblieben und kann heute noch im Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum in Madrid unter dem Titel „Jesus unter den Schriftgelehrten“ bestaunt werden. Es hat allerdings eine äusserst negative Beurteilung durch den bekannten Dürer-Experten Dr Thomas Schauerte erhalten; Johannes Gramlich, jedoch, lässt seine Leser darüber im Dunkeln.

Die Wahrheit in all dem ist, dass egal wie viele Bücher und Artikel noch darüber geschrieben werden (und es waren bisher schon viele), die behaupten, Heini Thyssen habe Werke des deutschen Expressionismus gekauft, weil er zeigen wollte, wie sehr er gegen die Nazis war, dies nach Ende der Nazi-Periode überhaupt nicht möglich und auch noch nicht einmal glaubhaft ist. Es ist Unfug, zu behaupten, August Thyssen habe Kaiser Wilhelm II als „ein Unglück für unser Volk“ betrachtet, denn er hatte sein Bildnis an der Wand hängen und kaufte sich 1916 mit der einzigen Absicht in den U-Boot-Bauer Bremer Vulkan ein, noch mehr vom Krieg des Kaisers zu profitieren. Und es ist auch nicht glaubhaft, angesichts des tief empfundenen Anti-Semitismus des Fritz Thyssen, zu sagen, er habe Jakob Goldschmidt 1934 geholfen, einen Teil seiner Kunstsammlung ausser Landes zu bringen, weil er solch ein treuer Freund dieses jüdischen Mannes gewesen sei. Fritz Thyssen half Jakob Goldschmidt obwohl er Jude war und nur deshalb, weil dieser ein unglaublich gut vernetzter und daher ein unabdingbarer Partner im internationalen Bankverkehr war – der seinerseits nach dem zweiten Weltkrieg den Thyssens half, der vollumfänglichen alliierten Vergeltung zu entgehen.

Alles, was die Thyssens je mit Kunst getan haben – und dieses Buch bestätigt dies, obwohl es eigentlich versucht, das Gegenteil zu tun – war es, die Kunst zu benutzen, um nicht nur ihre zu versteuernden Vermögenswerte zu tarnen, sondern auch sich selbst. Sie haben die Kunst benutzt, um die fragwürdige Teil-Quelle ihres Reichtums zu verschleiern, sowie die Tatsache, dass sie Emporkömmlinge waren. Genauso wie Professor Manfred Rasch kein unabhängiger Historiker ist, sondern nichts weiter als eine Thyssensche Archivkraft (die Art, wie er seine „akademischen“ Mitarbeiter dazu benutzt, um verächtliche Bemerkungen über unsere Arbeit zu plazieren ist sehr unprofessionell), so waren und sind die Thyssens weder „Autodidakten“ noch „Kunstkenner“, und werden es nie sein. Der Grund dafür ist, dass Kunst sich nicht auf der Unterschriftenlinie eines Überweisungsauftrags abspielt und in ihrer wahren Essenz das genaue Gegenteil von praktisch allem ist, wofür die Thyssens, mit ein paar Ausnahmen, jemals gestanden haben.

Wie es Max Friedländer zusammenfasste, war ihre Einstellung die der „eitlen Begierde“, des „gesellschaftlichen Ehrgeizes“, der „Spekulation auf Wertsteigerung“……des Wunsches “seinen Besitz zur Schau zu stellen“…..“dass die Bewunderung, die (die) Kunstwerke in den Gästen, den Besuchern erweckten, auf (den Sammler), als auf den glücklichen Eigentümer, auf den kultivierten Kunstfreund, zurückstrahlte“. Entgegen der besten Bemühungen der Thyssen Machinerie eine zuträgliche, akademische Auseinandersetzung mit den Thyssenschen Kunstsammlungsbestrebungen zu präsentieren, haben die Beteuerungen sowohl der ästhetischen Qualität, als auch des Anlagewerts ihrer „Kunstsammlungen“, die hier so ekelerregend oft geäussert werden, angesichts der unendlich unmoralischen Standards der betroffenen Personen keinerlei Relevanz. Das Einzige was zählt, ist dass das Ausmaß des Thyssenschen industriellen Vermögens so gigantisch war, dass die reflektierende Fläche für den persönlichen Schein der Eigentümer, wie den ihrer Kunst endlos groß war. Und deshalb scheiterte ihre geplante Tarnung durch Kultur was v.a. die Thyssens der zweiten Generation als Philister bloßstellte.

 

Johannes Gramlich

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in The Thyssen Art Macabre, Thyssen Art, Thyssen Corporate, Thyssen Family No Comments »

Book Review: Thyssen in the 20th Century – Volume 3: “The Thyssens as Art Collectors. Investment and Symbolic Capital (1900-1970)”, by Johannes Gramlich, published by Schöningh Verlag, Germany, 2015

After the ducking and diving and profiteering from other peoples’ death and misery, we will now be looking at the „shinier“ side of the medal, which is the so-called „artistic effort“ alleged to have been made by the Thyssen family. This had more to do with capital flight, the circumvention of foreign exchange controls and the avoidance of paying tax (art collections being described by Gramlich as „a valid means of decreasing tax duties as they are difficult to control“), short-term speculation, capital protection and profit maximisation than it did with any serious appreciation, let alone creation, of art.

Significantly, not a single review of this third book in the series „Thyssen in the 20th Century: The Thyssens as Art Collectors“, which once again constitutes nothing more than the shortened version (at 400 pages!) of a doctoral thesis – this time at the University of Munich – has been posted. Not a single suggestion that this student of history, german and music might not know what he is talking about, since he does not seem to have any previous knowledge of art history or obvious personal talents in the visual arts. Or about the fact that way too much of the art bought by the Thyssens was rubbish. Or that the Thyssens pretended to be Hungarian when they wanted something from Hungary, Swiss when they wanted something from Switzerland, or Dutch when they wanted something from the Netherlands.

In fact if there is one overall message this book appears to propagate it is this: that it is the ultimate achievement to cheat persistently, and as long as you are rich and powerful and immoral enough to continue cheating and myth-making all through your life, you will be just fine. Not least because you can then leave enough money in an endowment to continue to facilitate the burnishing of your reputation, so that the myth-making can continue on your behalf, posthumously. And if by any chance you can take advantage of another person’s distress along the way, so much the better – as Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza is said to have done from the Jewish collections of Herbert Gutmann and Max Alsberg and Fritz Thyssen from those of Julius Kien and Maximilian von Goldschmidt-Rothschild.

But: does anybody find this message acceptable?!

Mysteriously, this book also contains some very derogatory descriptions of the Thyssens’ true characters. Fritz Thyssen is described (in a quote by Christian Nebenhay) as „not very impressive“ and „meaningless“. His brother Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza is said to have been „difficult“, „unpleasant“, „avaricious“, „not always straight in his payment behaviour“ and somebody who „could not find the understanding for needs and aspirations of people who were in a relationship of dependency from him“. Amelie Thyssen is said to have tried to get the historical record bent very seriously as far her husband’s alleged distancing from Nazism was concerned and to have lied about the date of art purchases to avoid the payment of tax.

Fortunately, we did not know any of these second-generation Thyssens personally. But we did know Heini Thyssen, the last directly descended male Thyssen heir, and very well at that. Over the period of some 25 years (Litchfield more than Schmitz) we were lucky enough to be able to spend altogether many months in his company. We both liked and miss him greatly. He was a delightful man with a great sense of humour and sparkling intelligence. What was most astonishing about him, considering his family’s general sense of superiority, was his total lack of arrogance.

Heini Thyssen described the art business to us as „the dirtiest business in the world“. He knew of the secret-mongering of dealers, the hyperboles of auction houses and the dishonesties of experts. It was a choppy sea that he navigated with just the right combination of caution and bravado to be successful. But of course, he also used the art business outrageously in order to invent a new image for himself. The reason why, contrary to his father and uncle, he was extremely successful in this endeavour, was precisely because he was such a likeable man.

But this did not make Heini Thyssen a moral man. He continued to cheat about his nationality, the source and extent of his fortune, his responsibilities and his loyalties just as his father, uncle and aunt (and to some extent his grand-father) had done before him. And now, this series of books continues to perpetuate the very same old myths which have always been necessary to cover the tracks of these robber barons for as long as the modern-day German nation state has existed. The size and claimed value of the Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection also persuaded many members of the international art community and of the general public to accept this duplicity.

The all important Thyssen-owned dutch Bank voor Handel en Scheepvaart, for instance, is repeatedly said to have been founded in 1918, when the real date is most likely to have been 1910. This is important because the bank was the primary offshore tool used by the Thyssens to camouflage their German assets and protect their concern and fortune from allied retribution after the first lost war. But the information is precarious because it also implies a massive disloyalty of the Thyssens towards Germany, the country that was, is and always will be the sole original source of their fortune.

And again Heinrich and Heini Thyssen are said to have been Hungarian nationals, presumably because it is meant to excuse why, despite supporting the Nazi war machine that made possible some of the worst atrocities in human history, the Thyssen-Bornemiszas entirely avoided allied retribution after the second lost war also. In reality, Heinrich Thyssen’s Hungarian nationality was highly questionable, for several reasons: because it was originally „bought“, was not maintained through regular visits to the abandoned country, extension papers were issued by Thyssen-sponsored friends and relatives in diplomatic positions and because Heinrich actually maintained his German nationality. In Heini’s case, his status depended entirely on the fact that his mother’s second husband worked at the Hungarian embassy in Berne and procured him the necessary identity papers (a fact that will be plagiarised from our work by „Junior Research Group Leader“ Simone Derix in her forthcoming book on the Thyssens’ fortune and identity, which is based on her habilitation thesis (!) and as such already available – Strangely, despite being volume 4 in the series, her book is now said to be published only following volume 5). To call those Hungarian nationalities legitimate is plainly wrong. And it matters greatly.

When Philip Hendy at the London National Gallery put on an exhibition of paintings from Heini Thyssen’s collection in 1961, Heini apparently told Hendy he could not possibly be showing during the same year as Emil Bührle, because “As you know Bührle was a real German armament king who became Swiss, so it would be very bad for me to get linked up with German armament“. But this was not, as this book makes it sound, because Heini Thyssen did not have anything to do with German armament himself, but precisely because he did! Since this partial source of the Thyssen wealth has now been admitted by both Alexander Donges and Thomas Urban, it is highly questionable that Johannes Gramlich fails to acknowledge this adequately in his work.

Then there are new acknowledgments such as the fact that August Thyssen and Auguste Rodin did not have a close friendship as described in all relevant books so far, but that their relationship was terrible, because of monetary squabbles, artistic incomprehension and public relations opportunism. The only problem with this admission is that, once again, we were the first to establish this reality. Now this book is committing shameless plagiarism on our investigative effort and, under the veil of disallowing us as not pertaining to the „academic“ circle, is claiming the „academic merit“ of being the first to reveal this information for itself.

Another one of our revelations, which is being confirmed in this book, is that the 1930 Munich exhibition of Heinrich’s collection was a disaster, because so many of the works shown were discovered to be fraudulent. Luitpold Dussler in the Bayerischer Kurier and Kunstwart art magazine; Wilhelm Pinder at the Munich Art Historical Society; Rudolf Berliner; Leo Planiscig; Armand Lowengard at Duveen Brothers and Hans Tietze all made very derogatory assessments of the Baron’s collection as „expensive hobby“, „with obviously wrong attributions“, containing „over 100 forgeries, falsified paintings and impossible artist names“, where „the Baron could throw away half the objects“, „400 paintings none of which you should buy today“, „backward looking collection“, „off-putting designations“, „misleading“, „rubbish“, etc. etc. etc. The Baron retaliated by getting the „right-wing press“ (!) in particular to write positive articles about his so-called artistic endeavours, patriotic deed and philanthropic largesse, an altruistic attitude which was not based on fact but solely on Thyssen-financed public relations inputs.

The book almost completely leaves out Heini Thyssen’s art activities which is puzzling since he was by far the most important collector within the dynasty. Instead, a lot of information is relayed which has nothing whatsoever to do with art, such as the fact that Fritz Thyssen bought Schloss Puchhof estate and that it was run by Willi Grünberg. In the words of Gramlich: „Fritz Thyssen advised (Grünberg) to get the maximum out of the farm without consideration for sustainability. As a consequence the land was totally depleted afterwards. The denazification court however came to the conclusion that these methods of exhaustive cultivation were due mainly to the manager who was doing it to get more profit for himself“. Apparently Grünberg also abused at least 100 POWs there during the war but, after a short period of post-war examination, was reinstated as estate manager by Fritz Thyssen. This gives an indication not only of the failings of the denazification proceedings, but also of Thyssen’s concepts of human rights and the non-applicability of general laws to people of his standing.

One is also left wondering why Fritz Thyssen would be said to have bought the biggest estate in Bavaria in 1938, for an over-priced 2 million RM, specifically for his daughter Anita Zichy-Thyssen and son-in-law Gabor Zichy to live in, when Heini Thyssen and his cousin Barbara Stengel told us very specifically that the Zichy-Thyssens, with the help of Hermann Göring, for whom Anita had worked as his personal secretary, left Germany to live in Argentina in 1938, being transported there aboard a German naval vessel. After repeating the old myth that Anita’s family was with her parents when they fled Germany on the eve of World War Two, this book now makes the additional „revelation“ that Anita and her family arrived in Argentina in February 1940, without, however, explaining where they might have been in the meantime, while Fritz and Amelie Thyssen were taken back to Germany by the Gestapo. Of course February 1940 is also the date when Fritz and Amelie, of whom Anita would inherit, were stripped of their German citizenship, a fact that was to become crucial in them being able to regain their German assets after the war.

The defensive attitude of this book is also revealed when Eduard von der Heydt, another Nazi banker, war profiteer and close art investment advisor to the Thyssens, is said to be „still deeply rooted and present in (the Ruhr) in positive connotations, despite all protest and difficulties“. This has to refer not least to the fact – but for some reason does not spell it out – that some Germans, mindful of his role as a Nazi banker, have managed to get the name of the cultural prize of the town of Wuppertal-Elberfeld, where the von der Heydt Museum stands, changed from Eduard von der Heydt Prize to Von der Heydt Prize. Clearly because Willi Grünberg was but a foot soldier and Eduard von der Heydt a wealthy cosmopolitan, Grünberg gets the bad press while von der Heydt receives the diplomatic treatment, in the same way as book 2 of the series (on forced labour) blames managers and foremen and practically exonerates the Thyssens. It is a distorting way of working through Nazi history which should no longer be happening. Meanwhile, Johannes Gramlich is allowed to reveal that in view of revolutionary turmoils in Germany in 1931, Fritz Thyssen sent his collection to Switzerland only for it to be brought back to Germany in the summer of 1933 – as if a stronger indication could possibly be had for his deep satisfaction with Hitler’s ascent to power.

In the same period, Heinrich, after his disastrous 1930 Munich exhibition, teased the Düsseldorf Museum with a „non-committal prospect“ to loan them his collection for a number of years. It is also said that he planned to build an „August Thyssen House“ in Düsseldorf to house his collection permanently. Considering the time and huge effort Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza spent during his entire life and beyond on not being considered a German, it is strange that Johannes Gramlich does not qualify this venture as being either a fake plan or proof of Heinrich’s hidden teutonic loyalties. In view of the dismal quality of Heinrich’s art there was of course no real collection worth being shown at the Düsseldorf Museum at all, which did not, however, stop its Director Dr Karl Koetschau from lobbying for it for years. He was disappointed at Heinrich’s behaviour of stringing them along, which is an episode that leaves even Gramlich to concede: „(the Baron) accepted all benefits and gave nothing in return“. While the „Schloss Rohoncz Collection“ is said to have arrived at his private residence in Lugano from 1934, this book still fails to inform us of the precise timing and logistics of the transfer (some 500 paintings), a grave omission for which there is no excuse. It is also worth remembering that 1934 was the year Switzerland implemented its bank secrecy law, which would have been the ultimate reason why Heinrich chose Lugano as final seat of his „art collection“.

The many painfully obvious omissions in this book are revealing, particularly in the case of Heini Thyssen having a bust made of himself by the artist Nison Tregor when the fact that he also had one made by Arno Breker, Hitler’s favourite sculptor, is left out. But they become utterly inacceptable in the case of the silence about the „aryanisation“ of the Erlenhof stud farm in 1933 (from Oppenheimer to Thyssen-Bornemisza) or the involvement of Margit Batthyany-Thyssen, together with her SS-lovers, in the atrocity on 180 Jewish slave labourers at the SS-requisitioned but Thyssen-funded Rechnitz castle estate in March 1945. Both matters continue to remain persistently unmentioned and thus form cases of Holocaust denial which are akin to the efforts of one David Irving.

It is also astonishing how the author seems to have a desperate need for mystifying the question of the financing of Heinrich Thyssen’s collection, when Heini Thyssen told us very clearly that his father did this through a loan from his own bank, Bank voor Handel en Scheepvaart. This fact is very straightforward, yet Johannes Gramlich makes it sound so complicated that one can only think this must be because he wants to make it appear like Thyssen had money available in some kind of holy grail-like golden pot somewhere that had nothing to do with Thyssen companies and confirmed that he really was descended from some ancient, aristocratic line as he would have liked (and in his own head believed!) to have done.

The equally unlikely fact is purported that all the details of every single one of the several thousand pieces of art purchased by the Thyssens has been entered by „the team“ into a huge database containing a sophisticated network of cross-referenced information. Yet, in the whole of this book, the author mentions only a handful of the actual contents of Thyssen pictures. Time and time again the reader is left with the burning question: why, as the subject was so important to the Thyssens, did they leave it to such an unenlightened man rather than an experienced art historian to write about it? Is it because it is easier to get such a person to write statements such as “personal documents (of Fritz Thyssen) were destroyed during the confiscation of his fortune by the National Socialists and his business documents were mainly destroyed by WWII bombing“, because the organisation does not want to publish the true details of Fritz and Amelie’s wartime life? (one small tip: the bad bad Nazis threw them in a concentration camp and left them to rot is definitely not what happened). Or because he is prepared to write: „The correspondence of Hans Heinrich (Heini Thyssen) referring to art has been transmitted systematically from 1960 onwards“ and „for lack of sources, it is not possible to establish who was responsible for the movements in the collection inventory during the 1950s“ , because for a man whose assets are alleged to have been expropriated until 1955, it would be difficult to explain why he was able to buy and deal with expensive art before then?

Was Dr Gramlich commissioned because a man with his lack of experience can write about „APC“ being an American company that Heini Thyssen’s company was “negotiating with”, because he does not know that the letters stand for „Alien Property Custodian“? Or because time and time and time again he will praise the „outstanding quality“ of the Thyssens’ collections, despite the fact that far too many pictures, including Heinrich’s „Vermeer“ and „Dürer“ or Fritz’s „Rembrandt“ and „Fragonard“ turned out to be fakes? The Lost Art Coordination Point in Magdeburg, by the way, describes this Fragonard as having been missing since 1945 from Marburg. But Gramlich says it has been missing since 1965 from the Fritz Thyssen Collection in Munich, when it was “only valued at 3.000 Deutschmarks any longer, because its originality was now questioned”.

At one point, Gramlich writes about the „two paintings by Albrecht Dürer“ in the Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection without naming either of them. He describes that one of them was sold by Heini Thyssen in 1948. It went to the American art collector Samuel H Kress and finally to the Washington National Gallery. What Gramlich does not say is that this was in fact “Madonna with Child“. The other one remained in the Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection and can still be viewed at the Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum in Madrid to this day under the title „Jesus among the Scribes“. Only, it has received a highly damning appraisal by one of the world’s foremost Dürer experts, Dr Thomas Schauerte; Johannes Gramlich does not tell his readers about this.

The truth in all this is that no matter how many books and articles (and there have been many!) are financed by Thyssen money to tell us that Heini Thyssen bought German expressionist art in order to show how „anti-Nazi“ he was, such a thing is not actually possible and is not even believable after the Nazi period. It is ludicrous to say that August Thyssen saw Kaiser Wilhelm II as „Germany’s downfall“, since he had the Kaiser’s picture on his wall and started buying into the Bremer Vulkan submarine- producing shipyard in 1916, specifically in order to profit from the Kaiser’s war. And it is not believable, in view of Fritz Thyssen’s deeply-held antisemitism, to say he helped Jakob Goldschmidt to take some of his art out of Germany in 1934, because he was such a loyal friend of this Jewish man. Fritz Thyssen helped Jakob Goldschmidt despite him being Jewish and only because Goldschmidt was an incredibly well-connected and thus indispensable international banker – who in turn helped the Thyssens save their assets from allied retribution after WWII.

All the Thyssens have ever done with art – and this book, despite aiming to do the contrary, does in fact confirm it – is to have used art in order to camouflage not just their taxable assets, but themselves as well. They have used art to hide the problematic source of parts of their fortune, as well as the fact they were simple parvenus. In the same way as Professor Manfred Rasch is not an independent historian but only a Thyssen filing clerk (the way he repeatedly gets his „academic“ underlings to include disrespectful remarks about us in their work is highly unprofessional), so the Thyssens are not, never have been and never will be „autodidactic“ „connoisseurs“. And that is because art does not happen on a cheque book signature line but is, in its very essence, the exact opposite of just about anything the Thyssens, with a few exceptions, have ever stood for.

As Max Friedländer summarised it, their kind of attitude was that of: „the vain desire, social ambition, speculation for rise in value….of ostentatiously presenting one’s assets…..so that this admiration of the assets reflects back on the owner himself“. Despite the best efforts of the Thyssen machine to present a favourable academic evaluation of the Thyssens’ art collecting jaunts, in view of their infinitely immoral standards, the assurances of both the aesthetic qualities and investment value of their „art collections“, as mentioned so nauseatingly frequently in this book, are of no consequence whatsoever. The only thing that is relevant is that the extent of the family’s industrial wealth was so vast, that the pool of pretence for both them and their art was limitless. Thus their intended camouflage through culture failed and the second-generation Thyssens in particular ended up being exposed as Philistines.

Johannes Gramlich

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in The Thyssen Art Macabre, Thyssen Art, Thyssen Corporate, Thyssen Family No Comments »